[General] Don't call me uncle or a uncle.

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arjitsharma

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Which one is correct?
1. Don't call me uncle.
2. Don't call me a uncle.
If both the sentences are incorrect, how will I say to correct?
 

Skrej

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The second sentence requires 'an' instead of 'a', since the following word begins with a vowel sound.

They're otherwise okay, although they'd be likely be used in different contexts.
 

Rover_KE

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If both [STRIKE]the[/STRIKE] sentences are incorrect, how [STRIKE]will I say to[/STRIKE] can I correct them?
Please note the correct way to ask your question.
 

Skrej

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Actually, I just realized that you're from India, where the terms 'aunty' and 'uncle' are used as generic forms of respectful address, so in that context your sentences probably are more interchangeable than I originally thought.

In AmE the sentences would be useful in only a few limited contexts, but would be much less limited in Indian English.
 

Raymott

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I'd write, "Don't call me Uncle." But you'd say it the same.
 

Tdol

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Actually, I just realized that you're from India, where the terms 'aunty' and 'uncle' are used as generic forms of respectful address, so in that context your sentences probably are more interchangeable than I originally thought.

It surprised, and aged, me when I was called by such a term in Cambodia. I'm grateful that no one has yet called me grandfather.
 

arjitsharma

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I would like to know that different contexts where I can say the word "uncle" without the indefinite article "an" before it and with "an" before it. Could you write that different contexts.
 
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Raymott

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If 'Uncle' is a substitute name, you capitalize it, and you don't need an article. Eg. "Don't call me Uncle" means don't name me that.
On the other hand, "Don't call me an uncle" means don't refer to me by that term. Unless it's substitute name, the rules for articles are the same as for any noun.
"Are you inviting Uncle?" - this refers to a known person. "Are you inviting an uncle?" - this means any uncle (of yours).
 
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arjitsharma

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Does it go for brother, sister, dad, mom and so on?
 

Tdol

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These words generally behave in the same way.
 
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