Either - or in a negative sentence

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polokoza

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Dear friends,

I am not quite sure about the following two sentences:

It is not typical for either Peter or Paul.
It is typical for neither Peter nor Paul.

Is the meaning of the two sentences exactly the same? Meaning that it is not typical for any of them? Or is there some difference? Which one sounds more natural?

Thanks a lot, your help will be appreciated!
 

M.G.

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Dear Friend,
The 1st one is quite natural.both of them express the same, but use the 1st one))
 

5jj

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Both sentences mean the same. They are both fine, though the second has a more formal air.

'For' is correct, but 'of' is more commonly used.
 

Rover_KE

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