[General] Emphasis in English

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Diana82

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I want to ask please about the best methods for teaching EMPHASIS to learners of English. I mean if I have some sentences with emphasis on different parts of these sentences. How am I to teach this to students?

The last question: what is 'in' in the following:
He jumped in
I think it is part of a phrasal verb, but also can be a preposition.
Thanks in advance for any answers or suggestions
 
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emsr2d2

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I want to ask please about the best methods for teaching EMPHASIS to learners of English. I mean if I have some sentences with emphasis on different parts of these sentences. How am I to teach this to students?

The second question is about the difference between the following two statements:
a “have you got a sister?”
b “Have you got a light?”

The last question: what is 'in' in the following:
He jumped in
I think it is part of a phrasal verb, but also can be a preposition.
Thanks in advance for any answers or suggestions

Welcome to the forum.

I'm not quite sure what the first part of your post is about. Where do you think the different emphasis comes in those two sentences?

In "He jumped in", it's simply the preposition half of the phrasal verb "to jump in".

In future posts, please don't ask two unrelated questions in the same thread. It can get very confusing when people start to answer only one of the questions. One question per thread please.
 

5jj

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I want to ask please about the best methods for teaching EMPHASIS to learners of English. I mean if I have some sentences with emphasis on different parts of these sentences. How am I to teach this to students?
It's not easy to give a short answer to this. If you have access to a copy of his book* Kelly gives useful information on word and sentence stress, intonation and other aspects of connected speech, with teaching ideas and worksheets. The book comes with a helpful CD.

* Kelly, Gerald (2000), How to Teach Pronunciation, Harlow: pearson Education.
 

Diana82

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Many thanks for all the replies and suggestions.
 
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Diana82

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Welcome to the forum.

I'm not quite sure what the first part of your post is about. Where do you think the different emphasis comes in those two sentences?

In "He jumped in", it's simply the preposition half of the phrasal verb "to jump in".

In future posts, please don't ask two unrelated questions in the same thread. It can get very confusing when people start to answer only one of the questions. One question per thread please.
Thank you for your reply and advice.
I'm new to the forum... Please excuse me for any mistakes in use or questions.
I was able to interpret the following two statements as follows, but not convinced with my interpretation:


a “have you got a sister?”
b “Have you got a light?”
I think there is no difference when it comes to the structure of the two sentences, but the difference can be in meaning where we are just asking in the first, but expecting the listener to give us a light or lighter in the second. Looks silly interpretation, but really could not find a proper convincing interpretation.
 

SoothingDave

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Yes, in the second case you are asking if you can use their lighter.

In the first case you are not asking if you can use their sister.
 

MikeNewYork

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The use of emphasis on certain words in a spoken sentence can significantly alter the meaning. This is difficult to teach, however. One exercise that I have found enlightening uses a simple 7 word sentence: I didn't say she stole your money.

7 different variants:

I didn't say she stole your money.
I didn't say she stole your money.
I didn't say she stole your money.
I didn't say she stole your money.
I didn't say she stole your money.
I didn't say she stole your money.
I didn't say she stole your money.

Can you explain the differences in the sentences?
 

Diana82

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The use of emphasis on certain words in a spoken sentence can significantly alter the meaning. This is difficult to teach, however. One exercise that I have found enlightening uses a simple 7 word sentence: I didn't say she stole your money.

7 different variants:

I didn't say she stole your money.
I didn't say she stole your money.
I didn't say she stole your money.
I didn't say she stole your money.
I didn't say she stole your money.
I didn't say she stole your money.
I didn't say she stole your money.

Can you explain the differences in the sentences?
Got your point.. Many thanks
 

MikeNewYork

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It did not. I learned this decades ago.
 

5jj

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It did not. I learned this decades ago.
Fine. I asked only because that site used exactly the same sentence as you: I didn't say she stole your money.
 

MikeNewYork

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It's been around forever. Another version uses "never" in place of "didn't". And I understand your asking. I don't know where this exercise started, but I wouldn't be surprised if it predated the Internet.
 

emsr2d2

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How funny that 5jj should be involved in a conversation about things that predate the Internet. ;-)
 
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