FIANCEE

Status
Not open for further replies.

hotspicy

Banned
Joined
Jun 6, 2010
Member Type
Student or Learner
My sisters wedding is fixed so what is the term used for they guy if they not engaged and married eg We say Fiancee, but if the are not engaged then what do we call the guy as well as the term used for girl.Its an arrange marriage so we can't say boyfriend ,right.
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
My sister's wedding is fixed so what is the term used for they guy if they are not engaged [STRIKE]and[/STRIKE] to be married? [STRIKE]eg[/STRIKE] We say fiance[STRIKE]e[/STRIKE], but if they are not engaged then what do we call the guy? [STRIKE]as well as[/STRIKE] Also, what is the term used for girl? It's an arranged marriage so we can't say boyfriend, right?

I guess you could call him her "intended" or "intended husband".

I'm assuming that if it's an arranged marriage then they have not met nor are they regularly dating - if that's the case, then "boyfriend" would be inappropriate.

For info, once engagement has taken place, the guy is the "fiancé" (one é) and the girl is the "fiancée" (two és).
 
Last edited:

hotspicy

Banned
Joined
Jun 6, 2010
Member Type
Student or Learner
I guess you could call him her "intended" or "intended husband".

I'm assuming that if it's an arranged marriage then they have not met nor are they regularly dating - if that's the case, then "boyfriend" would be inappropriate.

For info, once engagement has taken place, the guy is the "fiancé" (one é) and the girl is the "fiancée" (two és).
Ok so can I say,
My Siter's intended is coming this month or
My Sister's intended hubby is coming this month.OR are We suppose to say
My Sister's to be intented hubby is coming.
He is My to be intented hubby...(please correct these sentences)
Also why do we say arranged and not arranged eg There's is arrange marriage .is this still wrong or We say arranged only
 
Last edited:

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Ok so can I say,
My sister's intended is coming this month YES

My sister's intended hubby is coming this month. Yes, although "husband" or "hubby" isn't required. It's implied with the word "intended".

OR are we suppose to say

My sister's to be intented hubby is coming. No. My sister's intended...

He is my to be intented hubby... No. As above. "My intended..."

(please correct these sentences)

Also why do we say arranged and not arranged? eg There's is arrange marriage.
I think you mean "Theirs is an arranged marriage." It's called "an arranged marriage" because it is a marriage which is arranged by other people.

Be careful with your capitalisation. You don't need a capital S on "sister's" or on "my". We capitalise the first letter of every sentence and the first letter of all proper nouns.
 

tripledave

New member
Joined
Jun 6, 2010
Member Type
Other
I'm not a teacher.

There aren't any common words for the man / woman in an arranged marriage. Phrases like "intended husband" or "intended wife" can work but they're clumsy.

Use fiancé / fiancée.

1) My sister's fiancé is coming this month.
2) He is my fiancé.

It makes more sense in English, even if it doesn't convey the the nuances of Indian culture.
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
You can also say "husband-to-be" and "wife-to-be".
 

hotspicy

Banned
Joined
Jun 6, 2010
Member Type
Student or Learner
You can also say "husband-to-be" and "wife-to-be".
Ok.Just last clarification
So will it be "My Sister's husband-to-be is coming home"
Also suppose if I am referring to him as a brother -in-law so can I say
" Hey My intended Brother -in-law is coming" or It shoud be" My Sister's intended is coming'."Which sounds better
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
Ok.Just last clarification
So will it be "My Sister's husband-to-be is coming home"
Also suppose if I am referring to him as a brother -in-law so can I say
" Hey My intended Brother -in-law is coming" or It shoud be" My Sister's intended is coming'."Which sounds better

My sister's intended is coming home = correct.
My sister's intended is coming = correct.
My intended brother-in-law is coming = incorrect. Messy though it seems, this can be said as "My brother-in-law-to-be is coming"!

"Intended" only works when you are referring to the person in relation to the person they are actually going to marry. "Intended" basically means "intended spouse" so you can't say "My intended spouse brother-in-law..."

Please also note, as I have stated in both my previous responses - you do not put a capital S on sister or sister-in-law or, as you have now done, a capital B on brother-in-law!!!!
 

~Mav~

Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2010
Member Type
Other
Native Language
Hungarian
Home Country
Europe
Current Location
Europe
Be careful with your capitalisation. You don't need a capital S on "sister's" or on "my". We capitalise the first letter of every sentence and the first letter of all proper nouns.
A little off-topic, but why is it an error to express my appreciation/respect towards somebody by capitalizing the first letter of the words like friend (My dear Friend), sister (You're my best Sister -- provided there are more :lol: ), dear Mom, etc. :?: Sometimes I even capitalize (capitalise) the word "you" as an expression of my appreciation. Do You, dear emsr2d2, consider it as a grammatical error? ;-)
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
A little off-topic, but why is it an error to express my appreciation/respect towards somebody by capitalizing the first letter of the words like friend (My dear Friend), sister (You're my best Sister -- provided there are more :lol: ), dear Mom, etc. :?: Sometimes I even capitalize (capitalise) the word "you" as an expression of my appreciation. Do You, dear emsr2d2, consider it as a grammatical error? ;-)

Yes, I'm afraid I do! Capitalisation has rules. We capitalise the word "I" but none of the other similar words (you, we etc), the first letter of a sentence, the first letter of all "proper nouns" (London Bridge, New York) - including of course people's actual names but also the "familiar" names we call them (Mummy, Daddy, Grandma, Grandpa but only when we're writing them as part of speech), and initials/acronyms.
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
If you want to express your appreciation, you might say Dear teacher (capitalizing dear only if it is the start of a sentence).


:)
 

SoothingDave

VIP Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
A little off-topic, but why is it an error to express my appreciation/respect towards somebody by capitalizing the first letter of the words like friend (My dear Friend), sister (You're my best Sister -- provided there are more :lol: ), dear Mom, etc. :?: Sometimes I even capitalize (capitalise) the word "you" as an expression of my appreciation. Do You, dear emsr2d2, consider it as a grammatical error? ;-)

Not a teacher.

Another thing to consider in this is that we have traditionally in English reserved this type of "showing respect by capitalizing references" to mentions of God.

Traditional believers still do this. I do.

If I am talking about some guy I know, I say "Last night, he went to the store and bought some limes."

If I am talking about God the Father; or God the Son (Jesus); or God the Holy Spirit (Three-in-One); then I say "After His death, His disciples were in a state of confusion until His Resurrection."
 

RonBee

Moderator
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
A little off-topic, but why is it an error to express my appreciation/respect towards somebody by capitalizing the first letter of the words like friend (My dear Friend), sister (You're my best Sister -- provided there are more :lol: ), dear Mom, etc. :?: Sometimes I even capitalize (capitalise) the word "you" as an expression of my appreciation. Do You, dear emsr2d2, consider it as a grammatical error? ;-)
There are ways to show your appreciation for someone without violating the rules of grammar or punctuation. You can, of course, make your own rules if you wish, but be prepared to be criticized for doing so.

:-|
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top