get things on the way

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beachboy

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Rafael Nadal has an opportunity to get things on the way.
What does it mean? Can I use this expression in situations other than sports?
 

sarat_106

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Rafael Nadal has an opportunity to get things on the way.
What does it mean? Can I use this expression in situations other than sports?

‘Get on’ is a phrasal verb meaning: to manage or deal with a situation, especially successfully. It can be used with any statement.
the way(of something, may be the opponent)

So it could mean: Rafael Nadal has an opportunity to deal with a situation successfully the way of the opponent or to meet the opponent.
 

Tdol

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I'm not a tennis fan, but I believe that he has had problems with injuries and form, so I think it could mean that he's got an opportunity to get back to his old form and success. However, the wider context would help make things clearer- do you have the URL?
 

beachboy

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Actually, I heard the commentator say it in a transmission yesterday, but you´re right: he´s had problems with injuries, and hasn´t won a tournament for some time
 

bhaisahab

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Are you sure he didn't say "under way" and not "on the way"?
 

IHIVG

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Rafael Nadal has an opportunity to get things on the way.
What does it mean? Can I use this expression in situations other than sports?
My greetings to a fellow tennis fan!
Maybe it refers to his chance to finally win the tournament, which of course, with the top 5 guys out of Miami, is really huge.
 

emsr2d2

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I would be inclined to think that the commentator probably said "under way" not "on the way".

Nadal may well be "on the way TO winning" a tournament for the first time in 11 months, but "to get things on the way" is not grammatically correct.

He could, however, get things under way. This means to make a start, to begin to make progress.
 

BobK

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Are you sure he didn't say "under way" and not "on the way"?
Sounds very likely to me - especially if the commentator had an accent that made him/her produce the sounds 'on' and 'un-' similarly. Some American speakers do this.

Incidentally, the phrase 'under way' originally referred to the movement of ships. Another use of 'way' in a maritime context is apparent in the sailing term 'steerage way' - which means 'going fast enough for the rudder to have an effect'.

b

PS I can't imagine what sarat_106 may have meant by this:

So it could mean: Rafael Nadal has an opportunity to deal with a situation successfully the way of the opponent or to meet the opponent.

I have to question the value of answers in the 'Ask a Teacher' that even a teacher and native speaker can't decipher...
 

BobK

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..."to get things on the way" is not grammatically correct. ...
Naturally - as emsr2d2 knows - there should have been the phrase 'in this context' at the end of this sentence. If 'on the way' is an adverbial phrase, there's no grammatical problem: 'We said we'd bring some food to the party, but it's late. So we can leave now and get things on the way.' ;-)

b
 

emsr2d2

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Naturally - as emsr2d2 knows - there should have been the phrase 'in this context' at the end of this sentence. If 'on the way' is an adverbial phrase, there's no grammatical problem: 'We said we'd bring some food to the party, but it's late. So we can leave now and get things on the way.' ;-)

b

Very good point! Thank you!
 
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