Got myself injected

Status
Not open for further replies.

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
"I got myself injected for rabies" or "I got shot for rabies".

"I will get myself injected".

"DR needs to inject you with these medicines".

Please check.
 

bhaisahab

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 12, 2008
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
Ireland
"I had a course of anti-rabies injections."
"I will have an injection."
"The Doctor needs to give you an injection."
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
I got/had a rabies shot/injection.

I'll get an injection.

The doctor needs to give you an injection.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us (RIP)
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
"I got myself injected for rabies" or "I got shot for rabies".

Although you may receive a shot, the person who gives you an injection does not shoot you unless they also fire at you with a weapon.
 

Skrej

Key Member
Joined
May 11, 2015
Member Type
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Although you may receive a shot, the person who gives you an injection does not shoot you unless they also fire at you with a weapon.


My Taiwanese colleague, who despite speaking excellent English with very little accent, still occasionally makes errors like these.

A couple of weeks ago she said something about leaving early to take her infant daughter to the doctor "to get shot".

With a straight face, I asked her "Doesn't that sort of violate his Hippocratic Oath?"

When she asked me what I meant, I said "So he shot your daughter?" to which she said "Yes, he said she needed to get shot."

I said, "Might be time to consider another doctor or at least a second opinion."

She said "No, he just said she needed her baby shots."

I replied "Oh, so he used a small gun?"

"Huh? What are you talking about? All babies have to get shot several times at different ages."

I then made some comment agreeing that while regular discipline was essential in child rearing, shooting them seemed borderline abusive. At that point she asked me if I was stupid or just messing with her.

I eventually pointed out that there's a significant difference in 'getting shot' and 'getting shots', one being far healthier than the other.
 
Last edited:

SoothingDave

VIP Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2009
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I would refer to getting preventive shots for rabies, or other communicable diseases as being "vaccinated."
 

Raymott

VIP Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
English
Home Country
Australia
Current Location
Australia
Or 'immunized' - though 'vaccinated' seems to be taking over here.
 

Tdol

No Longer With Us (RIP)
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
I would use I had my rabies vaccination.
 

bhaisahab

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 12, 2008
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
Ireland
The OP is in India. If you were bitten by a street dog in India, you would be advised to take a course of anti-rabies injections.
 

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
"I will get an injection tommorow". Is this correct? If I want to use this sentence but with "shot" then, what I have to say? "I have to get shot tommorow" it seems incorrect as you all told me and what about these sentences "my daughter needs to get shot(we need to use shot, if we are talking about one injection, right?)/ shots" or "all babies need shots/ injections"?
 

Barb_D

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 12, 2007
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Get "a" shot, not "get shot."

As I understand it, you don't get immunized or vaccinated for rabies ahead of time. It's only after you've been bitten by an animal you suspect may have rabies that you get these, so I don't believe that vaccinated or immunized (which are preventative) are correct. Someone with more medical knowledge about rabies than I got by reading Old Yeller needs to clarify this, though.
 

Raymott

VIP Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Member Type
Academic
Native Language
English
Home Country
Australia
Current Location
Australia
You can be vaccinated against rabies as prevention. If you are bitten by a rabid animal without having been vaccinated, you need the vaccination plus the rabies immunoglobulin. (I don't know the regimen).
We don't have rabies in Australia. This is why Johnny Depp got into so much trouble from Border Control for trying to sneak two dogs into Queensland.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us (RIP)
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
"I will get an injection tommorow". Is this correct? If I want to use this sentence but with "shot" then, what I have to say? "I have to get shot tommorow" it seems incorrect as you all told me and what about these sentences "my daughter needs to get shot(we need to use shot, if we are talking about one injection, right?)/ shots" or "all babies need shots/ injections"?

The noun shot can mean an injection. The verb to shoot cannot mean to give or receive one. Therefore, you can get a shot (receive an injection) to improve your health, but your health will certainly suffer if you get shot (are struck by a bullet or other projectile).

The flexibility of the verb to get, plus the multiple meanings of shot, make this particularly difficult to understand.
 

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
Okay, so "I need to get a shot tommorow" or "Doctor needs to give him a shot tommorow" these are correct, right? But we can also use the word "shots" but without an "a", did I get it right?
 

Barb_D

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Mar 12, 2007
Member Type
Other
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Yes.
Before you travel, you might need to check with your doctor to see what shots you need.
I need to get a few shots before I head off on my safari.
I'm going to the doctor to get some shots before I can start my teaching internship.

The doctor, a doctor, not just "Doctor."
 

bhaisahab

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 12, 2008
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
Ireland
I have never heard "shots" used for "injections/vaccinations" in BrE.
 

Tdol

No Longer With Us (RIP)
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
So have I, and we have jabs too, though in the case of rabies I would be more likely to use it for the injections after being bitten, regardless of vaccination status, as vaccination only offers more time before the serious injections I believe.
 

bhaisahab

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 12, 2008
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
Ireland
I have heard "jabs" used.
 

tufguy

VIP Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2014
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
Okay, so the words "shots" and "jabs" both can be used, right?
 

bhaisahab

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 12, 2008
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
Ireland
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top