[General] Help me....What did she say?

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Offroad

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A block of ice.
 

Williamyh

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A block of ice.

Hi Offroad...I can't understand she pronounces like "A block of rice" or "A block of vice", how did you hear ice, not rice or vice? How did she speak "of ice" in connected speech? You can explain in phonetics symbol if possible. Thanks
 

Offroad

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Hi Offroad...I can't understand she pronounces like "A block of rice" or "A block of vice", how did you hear ice, not rice or vice? How did she speak "of ice" in connected speech? You can explain in phonetics symbol if possible. Thanks
She says

/A blok o'vaice/

A block of ice.

Consonant and vowel, they're usually pronounced like a single word.

He got an apple. /gotanapl/


The most interesting part is that if you listen to English everyday, you will stop noticing this, focusing on main message, not details.:up:

You may want to bookmark this page:

A block of ice

Type any sentence and click the button to hear pronunciation.


Offroad
 

Raymott

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Hi Offroad...I can't understand she pronounces like "A block of rice" or "A block of vice", how did you hear ice, not rice or vice? How did she speak "of ice" in connected speech? You can explain in phonetics symbol if possible. Thanks
She doesn't say 'rice'. There's no suggestion of an /r/ at all.
We know she doesn't mean "a block of vice" primarily because vice doesn't come in blocks, while ice does.
 

Williamyh

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She says

/A blok o'vaice/

A block of ice.

Consonant and vowel, they're usually pronounced like a single word.

He got an apple. /gotanapl/


The most interesting part is that if you listen to English everyday, you will stop noticing this, focusing on main message, not details.:up:

You may want to bookmark this page:

A block of ice

Type any sentence and click the button to hear pronunciation.


Offroad

Hi, I actually understood the connected speech for Consonant and Vowel, I learnt it before such as /I like it/....but I don't know why "A block of ice" pronounce as /A blok o'vaice/, how come with v and a sound?
 

Offroad

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Hi, I actually understood the connected speech for Consonant and Vowel, I learnt it before such as /I like it/....but I don't know why "A block of ice" pronounce as /A blok o'vaice/, how come with v and a sound?
'ice' is pronounced /aɪs/.

/blok o'vaɪs/ it is.:)
 

Offroad

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How about v sound? There is only "f" sound...how come it change to "v" sound...
Mmm... I don't know.

Do some searching, I am sure you will find something.;-)
 

Williamyh

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Mmm... I don't know.

Do some searching, I am sure you will find something.;-)


I just found "of" in dictionary, the pronounciation "of" as below....I always use "f" to pronounce the end sound of "of"....actually it should be pronounced as "v".....

of [FONT=&quot] S1 [FONT=&quot] W1 [FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot] / [FONT=&quot]əv, ə [FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]; [/FONT]strong [/FONT][FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot] [/FONT]ɒv [/FONT][FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot] $ [/FONT]əv, ə [/FONT][FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot] [/FONT]strong [/FONT][FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot] $ [/FONT]ɑːv [/FONT][FONT=&quot]/[/FONT][/FONT]
[/FONT]


[/FONT]

[/FONT]


[/FONT]
 

Offroad

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Williamyh

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She doesn't say 'rice'. There's no suggestion of an /r/ at all.
We know she doesn't mean "a block of vice" primarily because vice doesn't come in blocks, while ice does.

You mean in some cases, we should not just listen what he/she says, we should understand the meaning and analyse what he/she says...right?
 

Raymott

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You mean in some cases, we should not just listen what he/she says, we should understand the meaning and analyse what he/she says...right?
We don't consciously analyse it. But any string of sounds means nothing until some part of our brain analyses it.
What I meant was that context will often determine the meaning.
If you hear "The book was /red/" context will tell whether the book was coloured red, or someone read the book. If you can't tell from the context given, you have an ambiguity.
In the original case, 'a block of ice', there is only one sensible interpretation.
 
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