[Grammar] How can an adverb be the subject of a sentence?

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donnach

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Outside lie big, pale granites discs, like millstones, for making wheel rims on.

How can an adverb be the subject of a sentence?

Thanks!

Donna
 

Rover_KE

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Outside is not the subject of the sentence just because it is the first word.

Compare:

'Here lies Tom Thumb.'

Can you find the subject of the sentence?

Rover
 

donnach

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I was thinking along those lines too, but 'lie' isn't a linking verb. Or maybe that's irrelevant. Maybe all intransitive and linking verbs can invert subjects and verbs? That seems to be what's happening in our example sentences, but I'd like to know the "rule" or "common knowledge", or however one would put it, if there is one or some to know.

Thanks,

Donna
 

5jj

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We can invert intransitive verbs and their noun subject when an advebrial of direction or place begins the sentence. This is especially common with here and there:

Down the hill rolled an enormous boulder
Just behind the King stood a white-haired man wearing a white cloak.
Down came the rain.
Here comes the train.

Inversion does not occur when the subject is a pronoun:

There she goes.
 
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