[Grammar] infinitive as adverb has same subject or different

Status
Not open for further replies.

satya_sson33

Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2010
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Hindi
Home Country
India
Current Location
India
# he paid you $50 to cross the river.

i have a confusion in that sentence that infinitive has different subject and it is as adverb but sir, when infinitive works like adverb then it has same subject. it used as a adverbial phrase that means 'the purpose of the subject'?

he paid you $50 = why did he paid you?.......... to cross the river
 
Last edited:

corum

Banned
Joined
Feb 8, 2010
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
Hungarian
Home Country
Hungary
Current Location
Hungary
# he paid you $50 to cross the river.

i have a confusion in that sentence that infinitive has different subject and it is as adverb but sir, when infinitive works like adverb then it has same subject. it used as a adverbial phrase that means 'the purpose of the subject'?

he paid you $50 = why did he paid you?.......... to cross the river

The implied subject of the infinitive clause is coreferent with the direct object of the matrix clause.

He payed you ... so that you cross the river.
 

vil

Key Member
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Bulgarian
Home Country
Bulgaria
Current Location
Bulgaria
I’m not a teacher.

Hi satya sson33,

In my humble opinion the infinitive as an adverbial modifier of purpose can be introduced by “in order” and “so as”:

Sometimes you retreat in order to advance.
Soams put on his coat so as not to be cold.

Regards,

V.
 

TheParser

VIP Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2009
Member Type
Other
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
# he paid you $50 to cross the river.

i have a confusion in that sentence that infinitive has different subject and it is as adverb but sir, when infinitive works like adverb then it has same subject. it used as a adverbial phrase that means 'the purpose of the subject'?

he paid you $50 = why did he paid you?.......... to cross the river

***NOT A TEACHER***

Good morning.

(1) Yes, it is ambiguous.

(a) Did you or he cross the river?

(b) In real life, however, there's no problem. People will know the answer from the context (all the words that are said before this one little sentence).

(2) But if this sentence is a school exercise, you would have rephrase it to avoid ambiguity:

(a) He paid you $50 for him to cross the river.
(b) He paid you $50 for you to cross the river.

(3) If you insist on using your ambiguous sentence, then most people would use common sense:

(a) When someone gives you money, s/he usually wants something in return. So probably he wants your help because he wants to cross the river and you own the boat.

(b) Of course, it is also possible that he said something like this to you: Here is $50. Please use it to pay for a boat owner to help you cross the river. I don't want to see you again.

Have a nice day!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top