[Grammar] How to explain "as according to"?

shadowsinner

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Hi all,

I'm wondering how I might explain "as according to" to my EFL students. I tried looking online but I couldn't find an answer. Is it the same as "according to"? Then, what is the difference?

The original question it appeared in was "What was happening as according to the article?" Is this the same as "What was happening according to the article?" or "What was happening, according to the article?"

The more I think about it the more confused I myself got. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.
 

teechar

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Hello shadowsinner, and welcome to the forum. :)

I'm wondering how I might explain "as according to" to my EFL students. I tried looking online, but I couldn't find an answer. Is it the same as "according to"? [STRIKE]Then,[/STRIKE] If not, what is the difference?

The original question it appeared in was "What was happening as according to the article?" Is this the same as "What was happening according to the article?" or "What was happening, according to the article?"

The more I think about it, the more confused I feel. [STRIKE]myself got.[/STRIKE] Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.
Can you tell us where you found that question please? In the above context, "as according to" is incorrect; it should simply be "according to".
 

shadowsinner

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Hello shadowsinner, and welcome to the forum. :)


Can you tell us where you found that question please? In the above context, "as according to" is incorrect; it should simply be "according to".

Hi!

Thank you for your insight. The question was one I made for an assignment for my students. I thought the grammar was correct, but perhaps it wasn't. Can you explain how "as according to" is used then?

I found a sample sentence online: "As for personal information obtained before 2004, it will be handled as according to this privacy policy." [source: http://www.tijs.jp/en/Privacy/]

Thank you for your help.
 

tedmc

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Hi!

Thank you for your insight. The question was one I made for an assignment for my students. I thought the grammar was correct, but perhaps it wasn't. Can you explain how "as according to" is used then?

I found a sample sentence online: "As for personal information obtained before 2004, it will be handled as according to this privacy policy." [source: http://www.tijs.jp/en/Privacy/]

Thank you for your help.

Sentences found online are not necessarily correct, especially those coming from non-English speaking countries. Stick with "according to".
 
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teechar

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I found a sample sentence online: "As for personal information obtained before 2004, it will be handled as according to this privacy policy." [source: http://www.tijs.jp/en/Privacy/]
That's actually incorrect. It should simply be "according to".

Can you explain how "as according to" is used then?
For example:
I think I'll go hiking tomorrow, as according to the weather forecast, it should be a nice sunny day.
In the above, "as" just means "because".
 

emsr2d2

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I think I'll go hiking tomorrow (no comma here) as, according to the weather forecast, it should be a nice sunny day.

Above is how I would punctuate that sentence. "according to the weather forecast" is additional information. Without it, and without the commas, you still have a grammatical sentence.
 
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