I got/was pulled over in US English.

Aamir Tariq

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A cop pulled me over for over speeding. is active voice.
I was pulled over for over speeding. is passive voice.

Now looking at the passive voice statement.
Where
I is the (Subject)
was (auxiliary verb)
pulled over (pas participle form of the verb phrase)

But most people in the US say "I got pulled over for over speeding" and if you make a negative statement, you would say "I didn't get pulled over for over speeding".

So is "I didn't get pulled over" an another form of passive voice?

What about the structure of the sentence

I (Subject)
didn't (Auxiliary verb)
get (present form of verb)
pulled over (verb phrase)

Tell me if "pulled" is functioning as an adjective or is it functioning as a verb phrase together with the preposition over in "I didn't get pulled over"?
 
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bubbha

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The form "get + past participle" is another form of the passive voice construction, sometimes called the "get passive", as opposed to the "be passive". It's usually used in less formal situations, though there are certain expressions like "get married" and "get lost" where it's used almost exclusively over the "be" form.
 

Rover_KE

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The moving traffic offence (AE offense) of speeding means driving over the speed limit, so you can delete 'over' before 'speeding' every time you have used it.
 

Aamir Tariq

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The moving traffic offence (AE offense) of speeding means driving over the speed limit, so you can delete 'over' before 'speeding' every time you have used it.

Oh thank you for letting me know that "over speeding" is incorrect.

I hope here is the correct one below.

"I got pulled over for driving over the speed limit."

While
"I got pulled over for over speeding" is the wrong one.
 
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Rover_KE

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"I got pulled over for driving over the speed limit.":tick:

"I got pulled over for over speeding,":cross:

"I got pulled over for speeding.":tick::tick:
 

Charlie Bernstein

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"Pulled" is not an adjective here. "Pulled over" is a verb phrase.

"Pulled" is an adjective in "pulled pork" and "pulled chicken." It refers to how the meat was prepared: by pulling it apart rather than cutting it.
 

Aamir Tariq

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"I got pulled over for driving over the speed limit.":tick:

"I got pulled over for over speeding,":cross:

"I got pulled over for speeding.":tick::tick:

Thanks Rover, I really like the way you people explain things on this forum. Especially when you put ticks and crosses at the end of example sentences to make it even clearer.

They also use the abbreviation DUI in the US that/which means to Drive Under the Influence (of drugs/alcohol)

I don't know it that would be correct to say in the US "I got pulled over for DUI".
 

emsr2d2

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They also use the abbreviation DUI in the US that/which means to Drive Under the Influence (of drugs/alcohol).

I don't know ​if it [STRIKE]that[/STRIKE] would be correct to say in the US "I got pulled over for DUI".

See above.
 

GoesStation

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My state doubles the fun: it's DWI here, for "driving while intoxicated".

But you wouldn't normally be pulled over for that. You'd be stopped for weaving, reckless operation, driving too slowly, or some other kind of offense. The DWI charge would follow a field alcohol or blood-alcohol test.
 

emsr2d2

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I'd heard "DWI" but thought it meant "Driving without insurance"!
 

Charlie Bernstein

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Thanks Rover, I really like the way you people explain things on this forum. Especially when you put ticks and crosses at the end of example sentences to make it even clearer.

They also use the abbreviation DUI in the US, which means Driving Under the Influence (of drugs/alcohol)

I don't know whether would be correct to say in the US "I got pulled over for DUI".

It depends on where you are in the US. It's a big country. Different places have different names for the charge. For example:

DUI = driving under the influence
OUI = operating under the influence
DWI = driving while intoxicated

There are more, but you get the idea.
 

Aamir Tariq

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It depends on where you are in the US. It's a big country. Different places have different names for the charge. For example:

DUI = driving under the influence
OUI = operating under the influence
DWI = driving while intoxicated

There are more, but you get the idea.

Please, feel free to tell me more, I have an insatiable hunger for learning these things. And thanks a lot for the additional information.

Is OUI *Operating under the influence) also associated with driving?
 

GoesStation

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Is OUI *Operating under the influence) also associated with driving?
In OUI (which I've never seen before), there's an implied ... a motor vehicle which presumably is part of the formal name of the crime.
 

Aamir Tariq

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And then there are the ubiquitous freeway signs that read: "Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving", so don't think you can't be arrested for driving under the influence of 'pot' in California. It's a DUI.

Buzzed driving sounds like driving as fast as a bullet. Am I right? Because an intoxicated person is not in his senses and he can drive way over the speed limit.
 

emsr2d2

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No, "Buzzed driving" is driving after smoking pot (marijuana). It comes from the idea that smoking pot/weed/cannabis/marijuana gives you a "buzz".

Drunk driving = driving under the influence of alcohol
Buzzed driving = driving under the influence of drugs
 

Skrej

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In AmE 'buzzed' can also refer to being slightly inebriated from alcohol - just enough that you can begin to feel the effects of the booze relax you, but not to the point where you're stumbling drunk, pass out, lose control, etc.

I've heard 'buzzed driving' used by people as a euphemism for 'drunk driving'. I suppose it's their way of trying to downplay they were driving when they shouldn't have been. If you're buzzed, you're still almost certainly over the legal limit, and can thus get a DUI.

Come to think of it, I wonder if that maybe isn't what the signs are referring to in Robert's post #14 as well.
 
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