[General] Inasmuch as

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grammarfreak

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Dear teachers :

Happy new year to all of you. I am going to make some explanations in regards to my understanding of the conjuction inasmuch as, I hope to receive your opinions and assistances about this matter :


Inasmuch as is a subordinate conjuction used to connect a subordinate clause (dependent clause) with a main clause (independent clause), it is a link between these clauses meaning in which proportion or extent something is true in another part of the sentence, it is used the most in formal English; especially in writing.

Subordinate Conjuction is a word or phrase that connects a dependent clause (subordinate clause) with an independent clause (main clause) establishing a relationship between them. The main or independent clause is the one which conveys the more important idea in the sentence, the subordinate clause depends on the main clause and must be attached to it to make a sense of completeness, the subordinate conjuction may be at the beginning or in the middle of the sentence, for example :

a) Because she didn't study, she failed her English grammar test.


b) They whisper to each other so that no one can hear.

In the first sentence the conjunction word '' because '' connects the subordinate clause (she didn't study) to the main clause (she failed her English grammar test)

In the second sentence the conjuction phrase '' so that '' connects the main clause (they whisper to each other) with the sobordinate clause (no one can hear).

Both subordinate clauses (she didn't study and no one can hear) cannot stand alone, it makes no sense by itself as well as they have a sense of incompleteness.


Sentences with inasmuch as :


a)
At the beginning of a sentence :

1) Inasmuch as the students had sucessfully completed their exams, their parents rewarded their efforts by giving them a trip to Europe.

2) Inasmuch as you are the commanding officer, you are responsible of the behavior of these men.

3) Inasmuch as you have done it to one of my little brothers, you have done it to me.

4) Inasmuch as he devotes a great deal of attention to mathematics, she spends a lot time studyng grammar.


b) In the middle of a sentence :

1) This make my task easier inasmuch as it was not necessary for me to make further inquiries

2) Capital punishment does not work inasmuch as it does not deter people from committing capital offenses.

3) They are rather similar inasmuch as they are the same size and color.

4) You will become a good pianist inasmuch as you keep practicing your lessons.


I hope this explanation may clarify my understanding of inasmuch as and may also help clarify the doubt of others as well.


Very sincerely,


Grammarfreak


ATTENTION :

* According to teachers' forum, the two sentences below in italic and underlined which I originally posted, are grammatically incorrect to be used with inasmuch as, I changed them for two new ones. One of them also suggested to change the subordinate conjunction inasmuch as in these sentences into the comparative form as + adjective + as, which is grammarly correct to be used in the aforementioned sentences. The sentences who were changed are as follows :


b:
1) He was treated badly inasmuch as he treated others

b: 3)
The teachers were very strict in the English writing exams inasmuch as they were in the Spanish oral exams.


* In the fisrt paragraph at the beginning of this post I changed the word '' expect '' for '' hope '' as suggested by the teachers' forum too.
 
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Rover_KE

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I am going to make some explanations in regard[STRIKE]s[/STRIKE] to my understanding of the conjunction inasmuch as. I [STRIKE]expect [/STRIKE] hope to receive your opinions and assistance about [STRIKE]in[/STRIKE] this matter.


Capitalise 'English' every time.

a) 2) should read '...you are responsible for the behavior of these men.'

a) 3) lacks a full stop.

b) 1) is ungrammatical.

b) 2) should read '...it does not deter people from committing capital offenses'.

b) 3) is ungrammatical.

Rover
 
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5jj

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I expect your opinions and assistances about in this matter
That sounds very demanding. You may, as Rover suggested in his correct, hope for help; you may request it; you have no right to expect it.
 

Raymott

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That sounds very demanding. You may, as Rover suggested in his correct, hope for help; you may request it; you have no right to expect it.
He can in Sense 1 of your link, though it's probably not polite to say so because 'expect' has other uses as well.
If the OP has made 26 previous posts and every one has been answered, he has a right to expect (in sense 1) that this one will also be answered.
 

grammarfreak

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Thank you Rover for your assistance, but I would like to know how those ungrammatically sentences must be written. I appreciate your explanation in regards to the use of the word '' expect '' and I also apologize for the misuse of it.


Respecfully,


Grammarfreak (native Spanish speaker)
 
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~Mav~

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Re: Inasmuch as (expect)

[OFF]


He can in Sense 1 of your link, though it's probably not polite to say so because 'expect' has other uses as well.
This reminds me of an Internet meme:

It’s funny when pregnant people say, “We are expecting”. Really, what are they expecting? It’s like they are not at all sure, and that there could be more than one possible outcome! When someone say “We are expecting”, it totally sounds like: We are expecting a baby… but it could be a velociraptor. I mean, what else could it be?

i-love-the-term-were-expecting.jpg



:shocked!: :loling:


On a more serious note: Dear 5jj, I don't think grammarfreak was being demanding. ;-) Judging from her/his writing*, s/he doesn't make the impression of a disrespectful person.


PS: *I almost said, "Inasmuch as I can judge from...", but that wouldn't really work here.


[/OFF]
 
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Rover_KE

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Thank you Rover for your assistance, but I would like to know how those ungrammatically sentences must be written.

Neither sentence lends itself to the use of inasmuch as.

b) 1) He was treated as badly as he had treated others.

b) 3) The teachers were as strict in the English writing exams as they were in the Spanish oral exams.
 

5jj

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Re: Inasmuch as (expect)

Dear 5jj, I don't think grammarfreak was being demanding. ;-) Judging from her/his writing*, s/he doesn't make the impression of a disrespectful person.
Don't try to be all conciliatory with me, Mav. I will not be deprived of my grump! I haven't had one for a week, and I am going to enjoy this one.
 

grammarfreak

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Dear 5jj :

I just make some editions and add more informations about the topic '' inasmuch as '' and I would like you to verify them to see if they are correct.

5jj I have always appreciated this website assistance which it has been valuable in my learning of English, as you can see, I am an advanced English student interesting in grammar, even in my native language. I am from Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and I have learned English on my own. Actually I am seaching through phonetics online and soon I will begin to post threads about it.


Thank you very much.

Yours truly,


Grammarfreak.
 
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