Is the following sentence correct?

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bit3034

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"Among the two ladies in the photograph, who is you?"

Is it correct to say who is you in the above sentence?
 

Tdol

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I would use:

Which of the (two) women/ladies in the photo(graph) are/is you?
 

englishhobby

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Odessa Dawn

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Here's a link to a similar question, I think the second answer is correct.
Is it O.K. to say "which one is you?" or the correct form is "which one ARE you?"? - Yahoo! Answers

It depends in what context you are asking that question...If you are looking at a friends group photo and not sure of which one is them, then you say "Which one IS you" not which one are you.But if you are addressing them in first participle/personally then you say "Which one are you"-but more correct is "WHO are you"?...WHO is for a singular person, WHICH is for singular inanimate/neutral objects.
Is it O.K. to say "which one is you?" or the correct form is "which one ARE you?"? - Yahoo! Answers

depend [dɪˈpɛnd]vb (intr)1. (foll by on or upon) to put trust (in); rely (on); be sure (of)

2. (usually foll by on or upon; often with it as subject) to be influenced or determined (by); be resultant (from) whether you come or not depends on what father says it all depends on you

3. (Economics) (foll by on or upon) to rely (on) for income, support, etc.

4. (foll by from) Rare to hang down; be suspended

5. to be undecided or pending
depend - definition of depend by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

Can the verb "Depend" be followed by the preposition "In?"

 

Tdol

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I wouldn't use it normally- though you could create a context where it would not be wrong, but you can nearly always do that.
 

5jj

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Can the verb "Depend" be followed by the preposition "In?"
In the sentence you quoted, "It depends in what context you are asking that question", 'in' is not directly connected with 'depend'. Compare:

1a. It depends why you are asking that question.
1b. It depends on why you are asking that question.

2a. It depends what context you are asking that question about.
2b. It depends on what context you are asking that question about.

3a. It depends in what context you are asking that question.
3b. It depends on in what context you are asking that question.
3c. It depends on what context you are asking that question in.

3c is ugly.
 
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Odessa Dawn

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Thank you so very much, 5jj, for putting me in the picture. I couldn't picture what you mean by "Com." Will you clear it up, please? Again, thank you.

 

5jj

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Thank you so very much, 5jj, for putting me in the picture. I couldn't picture what you mean by "Com." Will you clear it up, please? Again, thank you.

I don't know how 'Com' managed to appear at the end of my post. I have removed it.
 
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