Is the word that ends with (le)like circle,table pronounced like (o) sound?

mohammedabo

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZtnL_h9pCc
Is the word that ends with (le)like circle,table pronounced like (o) sound?
I mean the LE is pronounced like (o) sound
The man says any word that ends with le pronounced like (o) sound.
 
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jutfrank

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What do you think, Mohammed? What do you hear when you listen to native speakers? Does the final sound of circle and table sound like an 'o' to you?
 

mohammedabo

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What do you think, Mohammed? What do you hear when you listen to native speakers? Does the final sound of circle and table sound like an 'o' to you?


No, but he seems so confident.
I hope you saw the video.
 
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GoesStation

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I don't understand the presenter's language, but it's clear that he's saying the vowel before the /l/ is an "o". He's not saying that -le is pronounced like "o".

He's still wrong, of course. The vowel is a schwa.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZtnL_h9pCc
Are words that end[STRIKE]s[/STRIKE] with (le), like circle and table, pronounced with an "o" sound?
I mean, is "le" pronounced with an "o" sound?

No. It's usually pronounced with an "l" sound. We pronounce the "l," but the "e" is silent.


The man says any word that ends with "le" is pronounced with an "o" sound.

He's dead wrong.
People say strange things sometimes.

He should not be teaching the language.
 
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mohammedabo

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I don't understand the presenter's language, but it's clear that he's saying the vowel before the /l/ is an "o". He's not saying that -le is pronounced like "o".

He's still wrong, of course. The vowel is a schwa.


He speaks in Arabic, my own native language. He says any word that ends with le pronounced like (o) sound.
 

5jj

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As several people have already told you, he's wrong.
 

emsr2d2

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He speaks in Arabic, my own native language. He says any word that ends with le pronounced like (o) sound.

This is why we always recommend that learners use content created by native English speakers.
 

Charlie Bernstein

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. . . The man says any word that ends with le pronounced like (o) sound.
Actually, I don't think that's what he's saying. He's not saying to drop the L sound. He's telling you to put an O sound before the L sound: tabole, circole.

He's still wrong, though. Don't do it.
 

jutfrank

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Actually, I don't think that's what he's saying. He's not saying to drop the L sound. He's telling you to put an O sound before the L sound: tabole, circole.

Yes, that's what I understood too.

I don't want to defend this guy but I do usually try to be as generous as possible to other teachers. I can imagine that there could be some kind of pedagogical justification for saying that -le suffixes are pronounced very loosely as -ol. (I expect to hear some fierce challenges to this!) My thought is that if such a prescription leads a learner to pronounce this notoriously difficult syllable in a way that's more accurate than before, then the prescription does have some value.
 
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