lame in/of

Untaught88

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Hi,

He's lame in/of one leg.

Which preposition is used?
 

GoesStation

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"In". Lame is rarely used except for horses, at least in American English.
 

andrewg927

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Besides, "lame" sounds very negative when used to a person.
 

GoesStation

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I fixated on the original meaning of "lame", meaning "having an injured leg". Nowadays "lame" can be used about people as a slangy pejorative meaning hopelessly bad at something, or just useless in general.
 

Tdol

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You could avoid this by saying that he walks with a limp.
 

emsr2d2

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You could avoid this by saying that he walks with a limp.

However, the OP needs to bear in mind that walking with a limp can be caused by something other than lameness in one leg. Back problems, for example, can cause someone to walk with a limp even though there's nothing wrong with either leg.
 
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