"Like his damned father …"

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Odessa Dawn

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Apologize for posting such a statement and I am sorry for hurting others' feelings. However, I am a learner and I am confused since the dictionary has two different meanings for the word damned. I think that the definite article the has been replaced by the possessive determiner his. So, the exact word in the quotation is the damned. I am not saying that it should be the damned, but when we have possessive determiners, we can omit the. Am I right? By the way, we have a set expression in Arabic, but I haven’t found the exact version in English yet. Please forgive me for quoting the above statement, and thank you so very much.
damned noun - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online
damned adjective - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online
 

emsr2d2

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You're going to have to give us the whole sentence and the context. However, at first sight, I see nothing wrong with the phrase in your title.

"He is damned for all eternity, like his damned father."

Of course, it would make more sense to say "He is damned for all eternity, like his father" but even so, it is just possible. "Damned" is still an adjective. The noun is "father".


A far more likely phrase would be:

He is a burglar, just like his damn father!
 

iannou

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"He is damned for all eternity, like his damned father."
He is a burglar, just like his damn father!

I've always taken it for granted that "damn" as an adjective is a reduced form of "damned". "Open the damn door!" = "Open the damned door!" in the vernacular of my Canadian home. (Yes, we frequently damn inanimate objects.) And we often add g-o-d to damn. A touch of blasphemy to underline the point!
 

Odessa Dawn

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Apologize for posting such a statement and I am sorry for hurting others' feelings. However, I am a learner and I am confused since the dictionary has two different meanings for the word damned. I think that the definite article the has been replaced by the possessive determiner his. So, the exact word in the quotation is the damned. I am not saying that it should be the damned, but when we have possessive determiners, we can omit the. Am I right? By the way, we have a set expression in Arabic, but I haven’t found the exact version in English yet. Please forgive me for quoting the above statement, and thank you so very much.
damned noun - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online
damned adjective - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online

Just for the sake of knowledge seekers, in post #1 and the word in the below verse n is silent letter. Thank you.

damned/dæmd/
damned adjective - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online

Luke 24
[SUP]20[/SUP]But our leading priests and other religious leaders handed him over to be condemned to death, and they crucified him.
condemned /kənˈdemd/
condemned adjective (PERSON) - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online
 

iannou

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I think that the definite article the has been replaced by the possessive determiner his. So, the exact word in the quotation is the damned. I am not saying that it should be the damned, but when we have possessive determiners, we can omit the. Am I right?

Yes, you're right. It's incorrect to say "his the damned father" or "the his damned father".
 

Tdol

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but when we have possessive determiners, we can omit the. Am I right?

It's not a option; we must- as iannou says, the use of both would be wrong.
 
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