more weight or heavier weight

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jasonlulu_2000

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[FONT=宋体][/FONT]To my great surprise, sleeping less leads to_____weight rather than less,[FONT=宋体][/FONT]
A. more D. heavier

So heavier weight is not a natural collocation, is it?

Thanks for your help!

Jason
[FONT=宋体][/FONT]
 

5jj

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No, it isn't.
 

HanibalII

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To my great surprise, sleeping less leads to_____weight rather than less,
A. more D. heavier

So heavier weight is not a natural collocation, is it?

Thanks for your help!

Jason


You'd use 'more' weight.

And I don't think so.
 

jasonlulu_2000

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So weight is collocated with "much, more, less", isn't it?
 

Barb_D

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You can use "heavier weight" when the weight is a concrete thing - an item used in weight lifting. I'm getting stronger. I need to start using a heavier weight when I do this exercise.
 

emsr2d2

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So weight is collocated with "much, more, less", isn't it?

Generally, yes. However, the clue to the correct answer in the first post was the presence of "... rather than less" at the end. If the original statement had read:

To my great surprise, sleeping less leads to ________ weight rather than lighter

... then you would have chosen "heavier" because it is the opposite of "lighter". However, "more" and "less" are the appropriate choices here.
 

5jj

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Generally, yes. However, the clue to the correct answer in the first post was the presence of "... rather than less" at the end. If the original statement had read:

To my great surprise, sleeping less leads to ________ weight rather than lighter

... then you would have chosen "heavier" because it is the opposite of "lighter". However, "more" and "less" are the appropriate choices here.
If the original statement had read that, I would have thought it very odd. Come to think of it, even the 'correct' version with more seems strange. How can sleeping lead to more weight?
 

SoothingDave

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If the original statement had read that, I would have thought it very odd. Come to think of it, even the 'correct' version with more seems strange. How can sleeping lead to more weight?

I think the idea is that being sedentary for a longer period of time (sleeping more) would be thought of to increase weight gain.

But, apparently, those who sleep less gain more weight. So, snooze on!
 

emsr2d2

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Yes, recent studies have shown that people who sleep for fewer than (I think) six hours per night are more likely to gain weight easily and to remain overweight.
 

Tdol

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