[Grammar] must versus should

tahasozgen

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2016
Member Type
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
Hi there;
I have some problem about using must and should. I know their meaning, however in the questions below, I can not give correct answer. Here is the context of the should and must: http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2014/03/must-should-ought/


1-) You look very familiar. I ___ you before.

A) should have met
B) might meet
C) could meet
D) must have met
E) was supposed to met

My answer is A. Key depicts D. The link above says should :"to predict that something will probably happen or is expected to be the case, based on logic or a typical situation:"

2-) Jenny's engagement ring is enourmous! It __ a fortune.
A) must have cost
B) should have cost
C) was supposed to cost
D) would rather cost
E) used to cost

My answer is B. Key depicts A. Same logic with the question 1.

3-) Tim: While I was a student, I spent a year and a half studying Pygmy culture in the Central African Republic. I focused on unique aspects of their social structure and religion.

Simona: That __ absolutely fascinating.

A) ought to have been
B) would rather be
C) must have been
D) was supposed to be
E) will have to be

My answer is A. Key depicts C. Why ought to do not fit there? Since it is not a strong obligation, must shouldn't be there.

Thanks in advance.
 

bhaisahab

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 12, 2008
Member Type
Retired English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
England
Current Location
Ireland
The answer key is right and you are wrong in each case. Is that what you were asking?
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
You can replace "must have + past participle" in each case with "That's the only explanation" or "It's a certainty that ...".
You can replace "should have + past participle" in each case with "It would have been a good idea if ...". That wouldn't make sense in any of those situations.

You look very familiar. I must have met you before = You look very familiar. The only explanation for that is that I have met you before.
You studied hieroglyphics. That must have been fascinating = You studied hieroglyphics. For me, it's a certainty that that was fascinating.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
ought to have been must be archaic since I have not seen or heard anyone use it.

Another example for must.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
ought to have been must be archaic since I have not seen or heard anyone use it.

It is not archaic in BrE, though it is not appropriate in any of those sentences.

Nor is it archaic in the American version. We're a lot more likely to use the synonymous should have been though.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Nor is it archaic in the American version. We're a lot more likely to use the synonymous should have been though.

LOL. I said it was an another example for must. That said, I would avoid using ought to have been altogether. It is lengthy and there are better ways to express the same idea.
 

tahasozgen

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2016
Member Type
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
What is the meaning of ought to have been in British English and American English?
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
ought to have been must be archaic since I have not seen or heard anyone use it.

Another example for must.

LOL. I said it was an another example for must.
I finally understand what you were trying to say in the first quotation. I had had no idea what "Another example for must​" was supposed to mean.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
What is the meaning of ought to have been in British English and American English?
I think you meant this: What is the meaning of "ought to have been" in British English and American English? Using italics in your post was fine, but you have to switch to normal type at the end of the quoted text.

"Ought to" and "should" comprise a rare example of a perfect synonym, or as near to one as exists. You can replace one with the other with no change in meaning.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I used to tell my learners that it is always possible to use should in place of ought to. The reverse is not true. Should you doubt me, read this sentence again. If you should still doubt me, read this one.
Hmm. Did you ever find a marker for uses of should that can't be replaced by ought to?

In my region, you can use them together for emphasis. I'm not sure it's something that learners should ought to do. Mind you, this is another case where you can't exchange the two.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Top