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Abstract Idea

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Nightmare85 explains English quite well!



The above is not an imperative sentence, and the exclamation mark works.
 

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You're right! I am editing my previous post!;-)

But I only disagreed because you had agreed ...
(just kidding of course)
 
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Offroad

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But I only disagreed because you had agreed ...

and I disagreed after noticing that exclamation marks work in that kind of sentence.
 

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Germany go for the jugular!

Go Germany!!! Thrash them all!!!

But this is an imperative!

In my opinion, in this article, "Germany go for the jugular!" is not imperative.

Inside the text it reads:

"While their next opponents, who edged them out in the final of Euro 2008 two years ago, prefer playing pretty passing patterns, Germany simply go for the jugular - and to great effect."

I think the question whether one should write Germany goes still stands.
I have just browsed many texts in Internet using "Germany are", try googling it.
 

Nightmare85

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Thanks guys.
Okay, I will check that after 2 weeks because I'm going on vacation.

Bye bye, friends :)

Cheers!
 

kfredson

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In my opinion, in this article, "Germany go for the jugular!" is not imperative.

Inside the text it reads:

"While their next opponents, who edged them out in the final of Euro 2008 two years ago, prefer playing pretty passing patterns, Germany simply go for the jugular - and to great effect."

I think the question whether one should write Germany goes still stands.
I have just browsed many texts in Internet using "Germany are", try googling it.

That is most interesting. I have just been googling "Germany are" and I find that you are correct. It does, in fact, frequently appear in newspapers. I noticed, though, that they are all from the British Commonwealth. I have never heard it said this way in the United States. Perhaps it's a British thing. We would, if I am not incorrect, more naturally say "Germany is" or, if we wanted to employ the plural, say, "Germans are." I am not sure what happens when the subject is "the German team..." I would use the singular, but others might use the plural.

As for the imperative, you definitely need a comma in your sentence:
"Germany, go for the jugular."

Without the comma it appears wrong to me. After all, if you spoke the words you would pause after "Germany." Hence, we would employ the comma to make this clear.

So now I'll say, "Holland, go for the jugular!" (It would sound strange to say The Netherlands here.)
 

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I must confess to being an unschooled viewer from the United States, so I don't know a striker from a midfielder, if that is what you call them. I would cheer for a Latin American team, but what that Suarez gentleman did didn't appear to be fair. And, by the way, if a ball is clearly headed into the net and only a handball keeps it from entering, why isn't it counted as a goal?

Do you want some US suggestions for how to make it a more interesting game? Of course you don't, so I won't offer them here!
icon7.gif

That is most interesting. I have just been googling "Germany are" and I find that you are correct. It does, in fact, frequently appear in newspapers. I noticed, though, that they are all from the British Commonwealth. I have never heard it said this way in the United States. Perhaps it's a British thing. We would, if I am not incorrect, more naturally say "Germany is" or, if we wanted to employ the plural, say, "Germans are." I am not sure what happens when the subject is "the German team..." I would use the singular, but others might use the plural.

As for the imperative, you definitely need a comma in your sentence:
"Germany, go for the jugular."

Without the comma it appears wrong to me. After all, if you spoke the words you would pause after "Germany." Hence, we would employ the comma to make this clear.

So now I'll say, "Holland, go for the jugular!" (It would sound strange to say The Netherlands here.)

Welcome back to the forums kfredson!
 

kfredson

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Welcome back to the forums kfredson!

Thank you! It is remarkable how many friends you develop writing on this site. In any case, the end of year crush is over at school and the students have been sent off to work their mayhem elsewhere for a couple months. I am very disappointed about Brazil, though. Now we're just left with those cheaters from Uruguay.
 

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Go Germany!!! Thrash them all!
 

Tdol

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They probably will. ;-)
 

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What have you finally decided after all?

Is it

The Netherlands is about to win the 2010 World Cup.
or
The Netherlands are about to win the 2010 World Cup?

what if we change the country to, say, Spain?

Spain is about to win.
or
Spain are about to win?

Because certainly neither Germany is nor Germany are works here anymore.
 

kfredson

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Spain are the champion! And that's good, because I thought Spain was the best team. Of course, Brazil could have whipped them both.
 

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What have you finally decided after all?

Is it

The Netherlands is about to win the 2010 World Cup.
or
The Netherlands are about to win the 2010 World Cup?

what if we change the country to, say, Spain?

Spain is about to win 2010 World Cup.:tick:
or
Spain are about to win
2010 World Cup?:tick: chiefly British.;-)

Because certainly neither Germany is nor Germany are works here anymore.
Spain win 2010 World Cup.

Congrats.:cheers:
 

kfredson

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Spain win 2010 World Cup.

Congrats.:cheers:
I had pretty well given up on insisting that Spain takes the singular. After hearing so many commentators say "Spain are" I've begrudgingly come to accept it. But "Spain win the World Cup"? That really sounds wrong to me. :shock:
 

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I had pretty well given up on insisting that Spain takes the singular. After hearing so many commentators say "Spain are" I've begrudgingly come to accept it. But "Spain win the World Cup"? That really sounds wrong to me. :shock:
But it is not.;-)
 

philadelphia

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*Not a teacher

AmE would rather use the singular. Eg England was not that good at that WC. Talking more about the nation
BrE keeps tending to the plural. Eg England were not that good at that WC. Talking more about the players

You can perfectly notice the difference from reading the NYT and the Guardian.

First page :roll:
 
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