[Grammar] noun or noun phrase?

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tom3m

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I have been doing some tree diagrams and I have come across this: Výsledky obrázk


Why is the word 'chef' marked as noun and not a noun phrase? In Student's Introduction to English Grammar you may find this: So we prefer to say that a noun phrase (henceforth NP) normally consists of a noun with or without various dependents. (In other words, the head is accompanied by ZERO OR MORE dependents.)

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5jj

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In Student's Introduction to English Grammar you may find this: So we prefer to say that a noun phrase (henceforth NP(1)) normally consists of a noun(2) with or without various dependents(3). (In other words, the head is accompanied by ZERO OR MORE dependents.)
In that paricular sentence,
(1) the noun phrase is 'the chef',
(2) the noun is 'chef'
(3) the dependent is 'the'.
 

tom3m

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Thank you

What if there's a zero article before a plural noun, for example:

Oranges grow on trees.

Would the word oranges be marked as an NP or just N?
 

5jj

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It would be marked as an NP consisting of a single N only in that method of sentence analysis.
 
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