Omitting if in conditional sentences,

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atabitaraf

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May 19, 2010
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I doubted whether this rule and its relevant examples are right or wrong.
‘If’ is sometimes omitted in conditional unreal clauses. In this case we use the inverted form.
Did I have enough money, I would buy that car.
Do I have enough money, I will buy that car.
Had I had enough money, I would have bought that car.
 

5jj

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I doubted whether this rule and its relevant examples are right or wrong.
You can doubt whether something is right; you can doubt whether something is wrong; you cannot doubt whether something is wrong or right.
Did I have enough money, I would buy that car.
Do I have enough money, I will buy that car.
In 'first conditional' sentences, these forms are not possible in standard varieties of English. In 'second conditionals' with HAVE and BE, inversion (with no auxiliary DO) is possible in BrE: Had I enough money, I would..., Were I rich, I would, .... However, this is not common, and sounds formal/old-fashioned. Inversion (with or without DO) is not possible with other verbs.
Had I had enough money, I would have bought that car.
This is possible in third conditional sentences.
 
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