Prop-word "one"

Little man

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Hello.
I have a question about the word "one".
In the example: You take the long route, and I'll take the short. I have to use "one" after short or it is possible to leave it out. If it is, which version is more common?

Hope you will help me.
Regards
 

bhaisahab

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It is not necessary to use 'one'.
 

Little man

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But in this example, I suppose, it is impossible to omit "one".
This glass is dirty. Can I have a clean, please?
 

andrewg927

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But in this example, I suppose, it is impossible to omit "one".
This glass is dirty. Can I have a clean, please?

No, it is not possible.
 

GoesStation

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I have a question about the word "one".
In the example: You take the long route, and I'll take the short. I have to use "one" after short or it is possible to leave it out. If it is, which version is more common?

I find it much more natural with "one".
 

emsr2d2

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A (relatively well-known) lyric from the Scottish traditional song The Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond is "You take the high road and I'll take the low road". It uses what I consider to be the most natural construction - the repetition of the word "road". However, omitting the second "road" still results in a grammatically correct sentence. The same goes for your original.
 
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