[Grammar] RE: Alliteration-type Question

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RE: Alliteration-type Question

Hi folks,

I have been trying to find out the reasons why authors make the decisions to present certain grammatical/language features which they do. I have watched many You-Tube tutorials but it does not seem to be too often that people respond to viewers questions.

I guess this falls under 'alliteration', but what is the technical term for the application of starting consecutive sentences (in the same paragraph) with the same letter:

eg. "He walked in. Home was home. Having been away for so long it felt strange to Harold. Here he was back again. Heaven had answered his prayers."

In addition the this particular question, you can see there is the repetition of the letter 'H' buried within some sentences! I think this is called 'Paroemion'?

Many thanks in advance for any kind assistance offered here . . .

Best,

Paul David Seaman (UK)

<By the way: these questions are in relation to my imminent GSCE English exam!>
 
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Tdol

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Re: Alliteration-type Question

Is it actually buried here for literary effect or coincidental?
 
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Re: Alliteration-type Question

Tdol,

Is it actually buried here for literary effect or coincidental?
Thank you for your response.

I have read certain books where all of the sentences within the same paragraph commence with a word sharing a common first letter. This must be deliberate and not coincidental because (I feel) the odds are far too great for (say) five or six sentences to all begin in this fashion! In other words, I highly skilled author would have not done this by 'mistake'.

My example is not a direct quotation, but rather something I conjured up solely for the purposes of both replicating and illustrating the type of paragraphs/sentences I am referring to in my question.

Ta,

Paul
 

Skrej

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Re: Alliteration-type Question

This is certainly just my opinion, and conjecture as well, but it would seem that the main reason for alliteration would be to express some kind of emotion, especially humor. Clearly that's the case when used in children's books. Take for example Captain Underpants and the Perilous Plot of Professor Poopypants.

Certain sounds elicit particular emotions. For example, if I'm writing something about snakes or some sort of a sad soul, some sly specimen with serious stealthy, slippery, sneaky, shifty or similar slithering aspirations, then I can select sibilant sounds to suggest surreptitious impressions, signify unscrupulousness or suggest slyness in order to cast significance or suspicion on said swindler's or schuckster's essence.

In short, alliteration is used to focus attention on something.

It seems to me that merely using the first letter of each sentence is a very mild form of alliteration. It's just enough to draw your attention, and kind of group the ideas, but not really enough to establish a particular emotional effect.
 

Tdol

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Re: Alliteration-type Question

I still don't see the intended effect here. It may be an unlikely coincidence to have so many sentences beginning with this sound, but if people can't suggest why the writer does it, it may be a coincidence.
 
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Re: Alliteration-type Question

Skrej,

This is certainly just my opinion, and conjecture as well, but it would seem that the main reason for alliteration would be to express some kind of emotion, especially humor. Clearly that's the case when used in children's books. Take for example Captain Underpants and the Perilous Plot of Professor Poopypants.

Certain sounds elicit particular emotions. For example, if I'm writing something about snakes or some sort of a sad soul, some sly specimen with serious stealthy, slippery, sneaky, shifty or similar slithering aspirations, then I can select sibilant sounds to suggest surreptitious impressions, signify unscrupulousness or suggest slyness in order to cast significance or suspicion on said swindler's or schuckster's essence.

In short, alliteration is used to focus attention on something.

It seems to me that merely using the first letter of each sentence is a very mild form of alliteration. It's just enough to draw your attention, and kind of group the ideas, but not really enough to establish a particular emotional effect.

Thank you for your response.

That is very interesting. I see what you mean about certain letters/sounds can evoke certain emotions/connotations etc. I had not looked at it like that.

In the above example where I used the letter 'H' (as I have seen before in books I have read), there are no emotions/connotations generated by such alliteration. So perhaps I am trying to analyze 'nothing', if you know what I mean!

Ta,

Paul
 
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Re: Alliteration-type Question

Tdol,

I still don't see the intended effect here. It may be an unlikely coincidence to have so many sentences beginning with this sound, but if people can't suggest why the writer does it, it may be a coincidence.

Thank you for your response.

Yes, it is difficult (in this instance) to clearly define what the overall desired effect is. As mentioned above, maybe there is nothing to analyze here!

Ta,

Paul
 
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Tdol

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Re: Alliteration-type Question

Or just a bit of a cough. ;-)
 
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Re: Alliteration-type Question

I am aware that 'anaphora' is where you have the same group of words opening consecutive sentences (eg. as in the famous speeches of Sir Winston Churchill and Martin Luther King). But what about, please, when the only the first word of each consecutive sentence is identical.

For example:

"He walked upstairs. He quietly opened the door and turned on the light. He was absolutely certain he had seen something. He suddenly began to feel a little light headed and confused".

Is this technique 'anaphora' or simply a case of 'repetition', please?
 
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Tdol

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Re: Alliteration-type Question

The /h/ sounds could sound like someone with a bit of a cough.

I did not intend it to be perceived in that way; but of course the reader is fully entitled to interpret the text how he/she may wish.
 

jutfrank

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Re: Alliteration-type Question

If it is intentional, it seems to me be a case, as you say, of paroemion.
 
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Re: Alliteration-type Question

If it is intentional, it seems to me be a case, as you say, of paroemion.

Yes, quite. Maybe not an extreme application; but rather a more subtler form of (as it is only applied to the very first letter of each sentence - for the most part, at least).
 
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