[Vocabulary] RE: Slang Abbreviations

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RE: Slang Abbreviations

Hi folks,

With regards to abbreviations of a slang nature (eg. goin', talkin', doin', etc), I am trying to find, please, the equivalent for the phrase: 'wanted to'.

For example:

"They all desperately wanted to mess this guy up real good."

"They all desperately wann'ad to mess this guy up real good."​

Would "wann'ad" be the correct abbreviation in this case, please?

Many thanks in advance for any kind assistance offered here.

Best,

Paul (UK)
 

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Re: Slang Abbreviations

Just write wanted.
 
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Re: Slang Abbreviations

Just write wanted.

Hi GoesStation,

Thank you for your response.

That is all well and good; however, what if I intentionally wish to use such an abbreviation, please?

Paul
 
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Re: Slang Abbreviations

Hi again,

Just to add: I have seen the abbreviation written as "wann'ad" and also "wannad" in published books I have read in the past. These are something which have stuck with me in terms of curiosity and also because I would like to include the term within a short story I am currently working on.

There may well be other variants, but essentially, I would like to know which one (if any!) might be universally preferred?

Much appreciated as always.

Paul
 
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Lynxear

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Re: Slang Abbreviations

This is a website for learning English. You are wanting a very very common speech contraction of AE ghetto talk. You can probably source a dictionary of such language/slang on the internet. I would say that no English teacher here is knowledgeable about such language. I certainly am not.

Personally speaking, when I was a teacher of new learners of English I discouraged such talk. As a new learner, you do not score points for using such language in the general public. Even if you tried to fit in with a group that used that language, you would probably use you limited knowledge wrong and expose yourself to ridicule in my opinion.

I am reminded of a discussion I had with a Japanese language teacher when I took a course for fun. She cautioned me about using certain Japanese words and phrasal constructions. She told me that only crooks/gangsters and very low-life individuals used such language. If I used it with decent people, I would be cast as one of those people and be shunned. She also said that no one would explain why to me.
 

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Re: Slang Abbreviations

I have seen the abbreviation written as "wann'ad" and also "wannad" in published books I have read in the past.

Readers are going to wonder what that means - it's not at all obvious. Americans rarely articulate the t in "wanted", so there's no need to contract (not "abbreviate") the word.

You can substitute ta for "to" to inject a note of casual speech.
 
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Re: Slang Abbreviations

This is a website for learning English. You are wanting a very very common speech contraction of AE ghetto talk. You can probably source a dictionary of such language/slang on the internet. I would say that no English teacher here is knowledgeable about such language. I certainly am not.

Personally speaking, when I was a teacher of new learners of English I discouraged such talk. As a new learner, you do not score points for using such language in the general public. Even if you tried to fit in with a group that used that language, you would probably use you limited knowledge wrong and expose yourself to ridicule in my opinion.

I am reminded of a discussion I had with a Japanese language teacher when I took a course for fun. She cautioned me about using certain Japanese words and phrasal constructions. She told me that only crooks/gangsters and very low-life individuals used such language. If I used it with decent people, I would be cast as one of those people and be shunned. She also said that no one would explain why to me.

Thanks Lynxear,

Correct, I am referring to 'AE' ghetto talk. I probably should have stated this in my initial post. In case you are interested, the story is about two U.S. convicts about to be released from jail.

The story (dialogue) I am writing uses: goin', doin', thinkin', etc. I dare say this may not meet the approval of many advisers on here, and I certainly do not wish to cause a stir.

I am not sure if you aware - and maybe this makes no difference whatsoever, but I thought I would mention it - I am British and so English is my first (and only!) language. I did not gain any qualifications at school and so I am learning late in life. Therefore, I am a British student of English rather than an overseas student (learning English as a second language).

Cheers,

Paul
 
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Re: Slang Abbreviations

Readers are going to wonder what that means - it's not at all obvious. Americans rarely articulate the t in "wanted", so there's no need to contract (not "abbreviate") the word.

You can substitute ta for "to" to inject a note of casual speech.

Thank you GoesStation,

So my choice wording is a 'contraction' as opposed to an 'abbreviation'?

How, please, would it work if I was to apply your substitution of 'to' for 'ta, please?

Cheers,

Paul
 
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Re: Slang Abbreviations

As he says, he is writing a story, and you can write a story any way you want, just as you can sing a song any way you want. In addition, given his profile name, he may be writing song lyrics and, depending on the song, using perfect grammar sounds ridiculous, as it does in country music. Perfect grammar in country doesn't sell DVDs.

Try "wanna mess -----" or "gonna wanna mess ----". I am strictly into classical music, but you could try 'hip-hop' or 'rap', both of which would make me change radio stations.

Cheers Robert,

I dare say that the language (inc. swearing) I have used in my ex-convicts story could be associated with 'rap'. But not to the point where the clauses make no sense (which is a predominant feature in 'rap' music!).

I posted a thread on here a couple of months ago (as I was starting this new piece) and comments were made that it sounded too 'British'. Since taking these comments on board, I have read a book on the life story of a very successful and respected U.S. Law figure, and watched many episodes of 'Crime & Punishment' on Sky TV. Hence, I wanted to include some of verbal attributes I have picked up along the way.

While I like jazz music first, classical is a close second. However, more recently I have been listening to early 1980s Madonna.

Best,

Paul
 
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andrewg927

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Re: Slang Abbreviations

Early 80's Madonna is "Like a virgin". Good music choice. I still hear that song here and there when I go shopping.
 
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Re: Slang Abbreviations

They all wanted ta mess this guy up.

Cheers Goes Station,

Interesting! I don't think I ever I ever saw that form of wording (ie. 'ta').

Do you think that would be fine for U.S. speak then, please?

Thanks,

Paul
 
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Re: Slang Abbreviations

Early 80's Madonna is "Like a virgin". Good music choice. I still hear that song here and there when I go shopping.

Hello Andrew,

Yes, some great stuff in there for sure. I do have to skip the odd cheesy track here and there though!

I am listening to Madonna for two reasons: U.S. lyrics/terminology; and for the musical production side of things (which is second to none!). A lot of top-notch jazz musicians were involved with her music and so this accounts as to why certain aspects of the material are par excellence.

Paul
 
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andrewg927

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Re: Slang Abbreviations

Actually it's not "Like a virgin" but "Holiday" that I sometimes hear at the mall. I don't know all the details behind her music production but she was teaming up with her boyfriend at the time to produce the smash hit. There are other US musicians that I think have songs with more meaningful lyrics than her. Try The Beach Boys, Johnny Cash or Simon & Garfunkel, just to name a few.
 
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Re: Slang Abbreviations

Actually it's not "Like a virgin" but "Holiday" that I sometimes hear at the mall. I don't know all the details behind her music production but she was teaming up with her boyfriend at the time to produce the smash hit. There are other US musicians that I think have songs with more meaningful lyrics than her. Try The Beach Boys, Johnny Cash or Simon & Garfunkel, just to name a few.

Hi Andrew,

I have NEVER listened to lyrics in my entire life. But, because I have been studying on an English course, I decided to force myself to.

This is also because, at some point!, I am going to try and understand something of poetry. But in any case, I thought the U.S. lingo might come in handy for when/if I ever wrote a story set in the States.

Johnny Cash - I recently learned of channel 122 Sky Arts - is a very highly respected lyricist! I like some country music actually (it's rock n' roll I dislike). I also want to check out some of Bob Dylan and The Beatles (creative albums) - all from the perspective of absorbing lyrical content.

Paul
 
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GoesStation

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Re: Slang Abbreviations

I don't think I ever I ever saw that form of wording (ie. 'ta').

Do you think that would be fine for U.S. speak then, please?
Yes.
 
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Re: Slang Abbreviations

Hi GoesStation,

In case you are interested, here is the full sentence (and previous one) containing your suggested term:

Obviously, those fat faggot lawyers couldn’t give a rats-ass about the extremely high probability their client’s piano-wired torsos would wind up in the trunk of some old cheverellet, twenty thousand leagues beneath the Sixth Street Viaduct. Those rich law-schooled fags just wanted ta make a fast-dime - and at anyone’s peril.​

Thanks,

Paul
 

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Re: Slang Abbreviations

It's, uh, evocative. Without further comment, here are some suggestions:
  • rat's ass (no hyphen)
  • Chevrolet (capitalized; it's a proper noun)
  • twenty fathoms
20,000 leagues is over 11,000 km, just a little less than the diameter of the Earth. Even if the gangster telling this story is uneducated, you might not want to make your better-informed readers stop and roll their eyes over minor points like this. :)
 
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Re: Slang Abbreviations

It's, uh, evocative. Without further comment, here are some suggestions:
  • rat's ass (no hyphen)
  • Chevrolet (capitalized; it's a proper noun)
  • twenty fathoms
20,000 leagues is over 11,000 km, just a little less than the diameter of the Earth. Even if the gangster telling this story is uneducated, you might not want to make your better-informed readers stop and roll their eyes over minor points like this. :)

Thanks GoesStation,

OK, I will lose the hyphen on rat's ass. I did feel it warranted one though.

Missing the capital 'C' on 'Chevrolet' was a typo - honest! But the double 'l' was intentional as I have seen it spelled this way. In fact I have seen it spelled both ways.

"20 Thousand Leagues" was a kind of imagery/exaggeration (RE: distance) loosely referring to the film.

Cheers,

Paul
 
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