Talk to you soon/later

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Antonio

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Hi Group,

I just wanna know the difference, between this way to say good-bye. Talk to you later and talk to you soon, means basically the same thing or not? or it depends, on the context and the way you say it?

Thanks in advance,
Antonio.
 

Casiopea

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Antonio said:
Hi Group,

I just wanna know the difference, between this way to say good-bye. Talk to you later and talk to you soon, means basically the same thing or not? or it depends, on the context and the way you say it?

Thanks in advance,
Antonio.

Talk to you later , like "Hello. How are you?", is what's known as a stock phrase/clause. Aside from greetings and leave takings, they don't carry all that much information. Talk to you soon[/i], on the other hand, although it too is stock, carries a wee bit of meaning to it: "soon" means, shortly, so if you use it be aware: your friend just might be expecting you to call back or meet up with her/him later on that day or in the week. :D

All the best, :D
 

Tdol

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'Laters'is often used in the UK nowadays with a similar meaning.

l8rs ;-)
 

Tdol

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Gr8 explanation, Cas. ;-)
 

Tdol

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Qt! ???? ;-)
 

MW

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Computer shorthand

Excuse me - I really appreciate this site - BUT - these new computer shortcuts (err) shorthand is really starting to bug me.

My students use it in their emails to me and I mark their work down for it.

TDOL - shouldn't this site promote English and discourage these new shortcuts to proper English?

I fear that this new computer slang will have the same effect on English that calculators have had on math learning. Take away the calculator and a math student is unable to compute simple multiplication and division.

Will the new computer slang distract from learning proper English?

This is definately not a rant nor a troll. As a teacher I am concerned!
 

Tdol

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Re: Computer shorthand

MW said:
Excuse me - I really appreciate this site - BUT - these new computer shortcuts (err) shorthand is really starting to bug me.

My students use it in their emails to me and I mark their work down for it.

TDOL - shouldn't this site promote English and discourage these new shortcuts to proper English?

I fear that this new computer slang will have the same effect on English that calculators have had on math learning. Take away the calculator and a math student is unable to compute simple multiplication and division.

Will the new computer slang distract from learning proper English?

This is definately not a rant nor a troll. As a teacher I am concerned!

I used 'l8rs' in the context of a discussion about the phrase. The second, I was asking about because I had no idea, and still don't, what it meant. I don't use them in the forum as a rule. ;-)
 

Casiopea

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Re: Computer shorthand

MW said:
Excuse me - I really appreciate this site - BUT - these new computer shortcuts (err) shorthand is really starting to bug me.

Oh, I agree with you there, but as tdol has already mentioned, the usage in question was directly related to a student's question on computerese.

MW said:
My students use it in their emails to me and I mark their work down for it.

Computerese is a part of English. I understand your point, though.

MW said:
Shouldn't this site promote English and discourage these new shortcuts to proper English?

This site does promote English. As for discouraging 'these new shortcuts to proper English', we are in fact trying to do that.

MW said:
I fear that this new computer slang will have the same effect on English that calculators have had on math learning. Take away the calculator and a math student is unable to compute simple multiplication and division.

Digital watches come to mind. :wink:

MW said:
Will the new computer slang distract from learning proper English?

Well, now there's the rub. Students use the computer to learn English. Chat sites use specific "shortcuts" (i.e. computerese) as a language for communication. Those sites not only "teach" it, they breed it.

MW said:
This is definitely not a rant nor a troll. As a teacher I am concerned!

I agree with you all the way. Again, the specific usage in question was in response to a student's question on computerese.

All the best, :D
 
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