Teachers College in New York City

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keannu

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1. Does "teachers college" in the states educate future teachers for elementary schools or middle-to-high schools? In Korea, teachers universities, independent from other universities, are for bringing up elementary school teachers, while there's a teachers' college - I don't know what to call it in English, the Korean term is diffferent - that belongs to a university and it educates future middle-to-high school teachers. I don't know if this system came from the states.

2. What does this "chrome" imply here? Just a metal?
go2-14p)Everyone knows a school bus when they see one ― mainly by its color. That particular yellow has been the official school bus color for quite a long time. It dates back to 1939, when a professor named Frank W. Cry, of Teachers College in New York City, organized a conference. His mission was to establish national safety standards for school buses. At that time, children were being transported to school in all sorts of vehicles, including trucks and horse-drawn wagons. Cry's conference attracted transportation specialists from all across the country. Specialists from some paint companies came as well. After a week of discussion, the participants agreed on standards for bus construction and safety ― and also for color. They determined that a particular shade of yellow-orange with black letters was the most visible combination in the early morning and late afternoon hours. They named that yellow color National School Bus Chrome.
 

SoothingDave

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1. Teachers for K-12 education. There are not separate colleges/universities, though there are special requirements for "elementary ed."

2. Chrome is a shiny metal formerly used for bumpers. I guess the idea was that the yellow was particularly vivid, shiny, noticeable.
 

5jj

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When I Googled the words, the only hits I had that were not specifically linked to Korean sites had to do with Columbia, not New York.
 

Gillnetter

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1. Does "teachers college" in the states educate future teachers for elementary schools or middle-to-high schools? In Korea, teachers universities, independent from other universities, are for bringing up elementary school teachers, while there's a teachers' college - I don't know what to call it in English, the Korean term is diffferent - that belongs to a university and it educates future middle-to-high school teachers. I don't know if this system came from the states.

2. What does this "chrome" imply here? Just a metal?
go2-14p)Everyone knows a school bus when they see one ― mainly by its color. That particular yellow has been the official school bus color for quite a long time. It dates back to 1939, when a professor named Frank W. Cry, of Teachers College in New York City, organized a conference. His mission was to establish national safety standards for school buses. At that time, children were being transported to school in all sorts of vehicles, including trucks and horse-drawn wagons. Cry's conference attracted transportation specialists from all across the country. Specialists from some paint companies came as well. After a week of discussion, the participants agreed on standards for bus construction and safety ― and also for color. They determined that a particular shade of yellow-orange with black letters was the most visible combination in the early morning and late afternoon hours. They named that yellow color National School Bus Chrome.
Teacher's College in New York is a graduate school. The school offers courses for teachers who want advanced (beyond the normal four years of college) degrees. In the past (up to the early years of the 20th Century) there were Normal Schools in the US. These schools were short term (two years) and were directed at getting teachers into the classroom. Eventually, these schools started offering more courses and a student could study for four years. Many of the old Normal Schools became state colleges and universities. Today, most colleges and universities offer degrees in education.
 

keannu

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I think by this you meant that there are teachers colleges that belong to a university, they are not independent, covering 1st grade to 12th grade. I think teachers universites are Korean-specific ones and they don't have any other colleges like arts, engineering, humanities, etc.

Teachers for K-12 education. There are not separate colleges/universities, though there are special requirements for "elementary ed."
 

SoothingDave

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They prepare teachers for teaching grades K through 12.

As Gillnetter said, in many states (like mine) there were originally "teachers colleges" that only served to prepare teachers. These have evolved into full universities.
 

konungursvia

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In Europe too a secondary teacher is quite distinct from a primary teacher, though in North America they are considered similar but with different practical aspects.
 

5jj

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In England, trainee teachers specialise in primary or secondary education. However, once qualified, they can teach in either sector - or both.
 

konungursvia

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In Ontario, you have to specialize in two of the following: primary (grades 1-3), junior (4-6), intermediate (6-9), or senior (9-12). One used to be able to teach any age once specialized, but nowadays moving out of your specialized area requires a letter from the Minister of Education (not too hard to obtain in practice, if a principal wants it, but not automatic either). I am primary-junior, though I began teaching at university, then qualified in France, and later taught secondary.
 
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