The difference between "commit suicide" and "suicide"

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yuanchenhsiao

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Though "suicide" has a verb function, I've never seen it be used by itself. All I found is using "commit suicide".
Then is that possible for me to say the sentence like:

When the pressures are too much for teenagers to stand, some of them would suicide.

If not, why?
Thank you.
 
Technically it's possible, but it's such a rare form that it sounds odd to me. Webster's has it listed as a rare verb, but most dictionaries don't bother.
 
As a native speaker, I've never heard suicide used as a verb. I looked it up just now and it seems it is, but I and most teachers I know would mark it wrong if it were used that way on a test!
Suicide = noun
Commit suicide = verb
...at least in common American English usage.
 
Though "suicide" has a verb function, I've never seen it be used by itself. All I found is using "commit suicide".
Then is that possible for me to say the sentence like:

When the pressures are too much for teenagers to stand, some of them would suicide.

If not, why?
Thank you.
The use of 'suicide' as a verb is not uncommon among people who need to use it a lot, such as sociologists, psychiatrists, etc. The news media has not adopted the usage as enthusiastically, but it's not rare in AusE:

Waitress suicided after relentless bullying.

Here is a more creative usage:
BELLACIAO - Hunter S. Thompson warned he’d be suicided - Paul William Roberts
 
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