The temperature at which water boils is higher than that of water

hhtt21

Key Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
"The temperature at which water boils is higher than that of water". I would like to ask that if this self-made sentence is grammatically correct and natural?

Thank you.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Its grammar is OK but it fails the logic test. The temperature at which water boils is exactly the same as that of water which is boiling; it's higher than that of water which isn't boiling; and it's lower than that of superheated water.
 

probus

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 7, 2011
Member Type
Native Language
English
Home Country
Canada
Current Location
Canada
"The temperature at which water boils is higher than that of water". I would like to ask whether this self-made sentence is grammatically correct and natural?

Thank you.
.
 

hhtt21

Key Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
What do you think about this: The temperature at which water boils at a higher pressure is higher than that of which boils at a lower pressure?

Thank you.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Put a period after higher and before that and get rid of the rest.
 

GoesStation

No Longer With Us
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
American English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
What do you think about this: The temperature at which water boils at a higher pressure is higher than that [STRIKE]of[/STRIKE] at which it boils at a lower pressure?

That's better, with my corrections. You can express the same fact more directly with fewer words: The boiling point of water increases with pressure.
Replace "boiling point" with "temperature at which water boils" if you want to avoid a term which might require clarification.
 

probus

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 7, 2011
Member Type
Native Language
English
Home Country
Canada
Current Location
Canada
Yes they are. Your "that" makes it wrong.

I would like to ask "if"... not "that if".
 

hhtt21

Key Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
Put a period after higher and before that and get rid of the rest.

I cannot understand this so would you please write it openly (frankly/clearly)?

Thank you.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Your original sentence: The temperature at which water boils at a higher pressure is higher than that of which boils at a lower pressure?
My suggestion: The temperature at which water boils at a higher pressure is higher.
 

hhtt21

Key Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
Yes you have put a period after higher but you didn't put a period before that.

Put a period after higher and before that and get rid of the rest.

Thank you.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
Of course I did. Look:

....pressure is higher.than that of...

Isn't that period before that?
 

hhtt21

Key Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
Of course I did. Look:

....pressure is higher.than that of...

Isn't that period before that?
But isn't it even ridiculous than ungrammatical? By puttin a period you ended the sentence after that you continued with a small letter.

Thank you.
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
No. I was illustrating to you that the period I put was before "that". There wasn't a sentence after the period.
 

emsr2d2

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jul 28, 2009
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
UK
The period I can see is before "than". Admittedly, that means it is also before "that" but it is not immediately before "that".
 

andrewg927

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2017
Member Type
Interested in Language
Native Language
English
Home Country
United States
Current Location
United States
I see why hhtt got confused now.
 

Tdol

Editor, UsingEnglish.com
Staff member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Member Type
Native Language
British English
Home Country
UK
Current Location
Japan
Opening as requested
 

hhtt21

Key Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
Can we change the position of "at a higher pressure" in the sentence: "The temperature at which water boils at a higher presssure is higher than that at which it boils at a lower pressure" as "The temperature at which water at a higher pressure boils is higher than that at which water at a lower pressure" making the phrase an adjective instead of an adjverb?
 

jutfrank

VIP Member
Joined
Mar 5, 2014
Member Type
English Teacher
Native Language
English
Home Country
England
Current Location
England
Can we change the position of "at a higher pressure" in the sentence: "The temperature at which water boils at a higher presssure is higher than that at which it boils at a lower pressure" as "The temperature at which water at a higher pressure boils is higher than that at which water at a lower pressure" making the phrase an adjective instead of an adjverb?

Yes, it would still be understandable but I wouldn't advise it. The sentence reads better with at a higher pressure after the verb boils.
 

hhtt21

Key Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Member Type
Student or Learner
Native Language
Turkish
Home Country
Turkey
Current Location
Turkey
I know we can change some relative clause sentences into cleft sentences such as "Here is where we met" to "It is here that we met". So how could we change the sentence: "The temperature at which water boils at a higher pressure is higher than that at which it boils at a lower pressure"?

Is this O.K:"It is the temperature that water boils at a higher pressure is higher than water boils at a lower pressure"?
 
Top