'Therefore' followed by 'this is why'

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Agnes

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Is it correct to say ' therefore, this is why I chose to live my life this way'.
Can the word 'Therefore' be followed by 'this is why'?:roll:
 

leonwool

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If you have just explained a reason for something, you can follow up with a sentence, starting with "This is why ....". Eg. I needed to get to work quickly. This is why I decided to skip my breakfast.

If you now start to debate the reasons for reaching this conclusion you could contruct a sentence starting "Therefor, this is why...".

So usually we don't do this.

You knew that didn't you? I knew that you knew that. I knew you knew I knew that . No, I didn't know that you knew that I knew that ........... (Ad infinitum)

It's English Jim - But not as we know it.
 

BobK

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Note that the word 'therefore' (stressed on the first syllable) has a final e. Confusingly there is also a word 'therefor', stressed on the second syllable', that means 'for that thing' *- almost exactly the opposite, in some contexts:

'A, therefore B' -> B happened because of A, or 'B. The reason therefor was A.'

To avoid confusion, people have let the second one fall out of use. (Online Etymology Dictionary )

b
PS This mirrors all the other 'there + preposition' words, such as thereat, therein, thereafter, thereupon... (all of which are fairly obscure, and can sensibly be ignored for most exams ;-))
 
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Agnes

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Note that the word 'therefore' (stressed on the first syllable) has a final e. Confusingly there is also a word 'therefor', stressed on the second syllable', that means 'for that thing' *- almost exactly the opposite, in some contexts:

'A, therefore B' -> B happened because of A, or 'B. The reason therefor was A.'

To avoid confusion, people have let the second one fall out of use. (Online Etymology Dictionary )

b
PS This mirrors all the other 'there + preposition' words, such as thereat, therein, thereafter, thereupon... (all of which are fairly obscure, and can sensibly be ignored for most exams ;-))



Ok, thanks. I take it that it IS correct to say 'Therefore, this is why I chose to live my life this way' then. :)
 

Allen165

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Ok, thanks. I take it that it IS correct to say 'Therefore, this is why I chose to live my life this way' then. :)

I have to disagree. "Therefore" and "this is why" express the same thing, namely, the reason why you chose to live your life a certain way. It seems redundant to use both.

"Yesterday I didn't work out. That's why I went to the gym today."

Would you really say, "Therefore, that's why I went to the gym today."? I wouldn't. I'd use either "therefore" or "that's why," but not both.

NOT A TEACHER.
 

BobK

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:up: Absoutely. It's not ungrammatical, but pleonastic.

b
 
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