to sb's feet.

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panicmonger

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Dear Sirs,

1. He gets/rises/jumps to his feet when she walks in.
2. The injured woman staggered to her feet.

Does the 'to' above mean 'on'?
1. He gets/rises/jumps on his feet when she walks in.
2. The injured woman staggered on her feet.



I really and truly do not understand why 'to' are used in the sentences above?

Could you give me a hand? please, thank you.
 

Tdol

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Sometimes you'll see it used when the person had difficulty in standing (age/health, etc).
 

panicmonger

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Sometimes you'll see it used when the person had difficulty in standing (age/health, etc).

Thank you, Mr. Tdol.

Am I right to say: "The bedridden old man rose to his feet when the nurse walked into his ward."?
 

Tdol

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Grammatically, yes, but would a bedridden person do that? ;-)
 
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