Trying to discern the slang in DMX's "Get it on the Floor".

darri

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"Chorus: Swizz Beatz & DMX]

Get it on the floor, get it-get it on the floor (What?)
Get it on the floor, get it-get it on the floor (What?)
You don't wanna party, then your a*s gotta go (What?)
You don't wanna party, then your a*s gotta go
Now you can ride to this motherf**ker, bounce to this motherf**ker
Freak to this motherf**ker
(Let's get it on)
Get it on the floor (What?), get it-get it on the floor (What?)
Get it on the floor (What?), get it-get it on the floor (Woo)"

DMX - Get it on the Floor

Can someone explain to me what does the section in bold means?
 
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emsr2d2

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Please note that I have added asterisks to the profanity in your post. Please don't post any swear words in full.

I'm not 100% sure but I would take "this motherf**ker" to mean "this song". I think "ride/bounce/freak" are used to mean "dance".

I know one thing - you're not going to improve your English by listening to stuff like this.
 

probus

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To be strictly fair and inclusive I suppose we have to include hip-hop jargon as part of the English language, but it has little if any practical use outside its own genre.
 

Skrej

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Now you can ride to this motherf**ker, bounce to this motherf**ker
Freak to this motherf**ker

Can someone explain to me what does the section in bold means?
I'm not 100% sure but I would take "this motherf**ker" to mean "this song".

While I agree with emsr that's what the expression means in this context, it's a non-specific term. With the right context, it could refer to almost anything, even a person.

Don't think of it a specifically meaning only music or song. Think of the phrase as similar to the pronoun 'it', where context determines what "it" is.
 

probus

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That's the noun, as in this case.

The -ing form also serves as a general-purpose intensifier, a synonym for extremely.

Needless to say, learners should avoid this and all similar terms, or they risk giving great offence.
 
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Tdol

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Dance, and don't bother with the grammar.
 
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