where are the jobs?

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Shoreditch

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Guten morgen, liebe freunde! :hi:

If I call a job agency to find out where they have jobs they can offer, what am I supposed to say?

I think this, but it sounds awkward to me:
Where are the jobs locally that you can offer?

If I register at a job agency, what am I then? Their clients? Their customer? Their employee? What? :up:
 

HanibalII

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Guten morgen, liebe freunde! :hi:

If I call a job agency to find out where they have jobs they can offer, what am I supposed to say?

I think this, but it sounds awkward to me:
Where are the jobs locally that you can offer?

If I register at a job agency, what am I then? Their clients? Their customer? Their employee? What? :up:

If you were asking about local jobs, you would say (or at least I would say) 'Could you please let me know if you have any local jobs on offer'.

If you register with a job agency, you're their client.

Please try and use English here. Your opening welcome phrase may confuse other members.
 

Shoreditch

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Hannibal wrote: 'Could you please let me know if you have any local jobs on offer'.

Shoreditch: I am not interested in local jobs. It is not what I want to ask. What I want is to know where the jobs are.. Where are the jobs? Does it sound okay?

hannibal: Please try and use English here.

Sorry for the faux pas. :oops:
 

emsr2d2

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Sorry for the faux pas. :oops:

Swapping German greetings for French endings isn't much of an improvement, though at least we do use the latter.
 

Shoreditch

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Is "Where are the jobs?" idiomatic?
 

HanibalII

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Guten morgen, liebe freunde! :hi:

If I call a job agency to find out where they have jobs they can offer, what am I supposed to say?

I think this, but it sounds awkward to me:
Where are the jobs locally that you can offer?

If I register at a job agency, what am I then? Their clients? Their customer? Their employee? What? :up:

If you were asking about local jobs, you would say (or at least I would say) 'Could you please let me know if you have any local jobs on offer'.

Hannibal wrote: 'Could you please let me know if you have any local jobs on offer'.

Shoreditch: I am not interested in local jobs. It is not what I want to ask. What I want is to know where the jobs are.. Where are the jobs? Does it sound okay?

hannibal: Please try and use English here.

Sorry for the faux pas. :oops:


You wanted to know where local jobs were on offer in your original comment. Then you state you're not looking for local jobs.

My sentence satisfied all of your inquiries. If it is incorrect, you need to provide more context. Context is key in any English conversation.

If you want to know where the jobs are, you need to be more specific, especially if talking to a job agency. I would say 'Could you please tell me if there are any jobs available at *such and such store* in *such and such* town.
 
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Shoreditch

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You wanted to know where local jobs were on offer in your original comment. Then you state you're not looking for local jobs.

My sentence satisfied all of your inquiries. If it is incorrect, you need to provide more context. Context is key in any English conversation.

"Where are the jobs locally" does not mean "Where is the location of the jobs?" I assumed it did.

locally (def from dictionary.com)

2.with regard to place.
 

HanibalII

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"Where are the jobs locally" does not mean "Where is the location of the jobs?" I assumed it did.

locally (def from dictionary.com)

2.with regard to place.


No, they have different meanings.
 

emsr2d2

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Usually, if you contact a job agency and become a client, they will ask a series of questions, such as:

- Are you looking to work part-time or full-time?
- Are you looking for casual work or do you want a temporary/permanent contract?
- Where are you looking to work? Give the name of a town/city and the radius around it in which you wish to work.

If I rang an employment agency here and said "Where are the jobs?" they would probably think I was being sarcastic and suggesting that they had no jobs on offer. If I were making a quick enquiry to see if it was worth registering with them, I might call them and say "I'm thinking of registering with you but first, can you tell me if you have any vacancies listed within a 5-mile radius of [name of town]?"
 

konungursvia

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Attention: Job agencies (many though not all) pretend to have just the right job for you. When they have little or nothing going on, they don't sit spinning their pencils around their thumbs; they call people in for fake jobs, and ask them to have their friends send in their resumes too. Frequently, they say they are almost sure they'll place you soon. Then, a few days later, you will call back to find the job was cancelled.

At times there is work and they can place you. I simply mean to say that you shouldn't let them get your hopes high, until you're sent to a client interview (their client).

As for registration, what are you then? Nothing, a number, a piece of paper.
 

Shoreditch

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Does the sentence "Where are the stores locally?" mean

"Where are the local stores?"

or

"Where are the locations of the stores?"

, or it could mean either?

I know it was a question I asked already, and that a member thankfully answered it. Nonetheless, I need reinforcement because if it is the first sentence with which the title is synonymous, then the flimsy foundations of my English knowledge will be shattered. :cry:
 

Shoreditch

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Nothing ... a piece of paper.

As I experience it, it is not a piece of paper but mor like a piece of the proverbial thing. You know what i mean? :)
 

5jj

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Does the sentence "Where are the stores locally?" mean

"Where are the local stores?"
or
"Where are the locations of the stores?"
, or it could mean either?
Hanniballl has already told you that 'locally' and 'location' have different meanings. The first two sentences mean roughly the same. The third has a different meaning.
if it is the first sentence with which the title is synonymous, then the flimsy foundations of my English knowledge will be shattered. :cry:
Don't exaggerarate. You've misunderstood the meaning of a word, that's all.
 

Shoreditch

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I am very surprised I lived my life in such ignorance. "locally" is a frequent word which I misused all my life. I live and learn. I am really surprised.
 

emsr2d2

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It simply means "close to" relative to wherever the speaker is talking about.

My local shops are the shops which are closest to my house.
The local schools are the ones which are closest to my house.

If I travel to a city I have never been to before and I want to find a shoe shop which is close by, I would ask someone "Is there a local shoe shop?" They will then direct me to the closest shoe shop.
 

Tdol

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