which one is more polite?

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Zoe2008

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1. Have we received the payment of USDxxx from the customer?
2. Did you receive the payment of USDxxx from the customer?
3. Please advise the payment of USDxxx upon receive.
 

BobK

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1. Have we received the payment of USDxxx from the customer?
2. Did you receive the payment of USDxxx from the customer?
3. Please advise the payment of USDxxx upon receive.

1 and 2 sound to me equally polite, although, depending on the context, 'we' may have a 'distancing' effect (which could be regarded as more polite). 3 is just wrong. Perhaps in Am English you can 'advise payment' (in the sense of reporting it). In Br English, 'advise payment' is an expression that would only be used in contexts such as this: 'That money-lender breaks legs; if you have a debt, I advise payment'.

But whether or not 'advise payment' is acceptable, 'upon receive' isn't. I think you mean 'upon receipt' (which would be clearer if you said 'when you receive it' - 'upon receipt' sounds rather Dickensian: it's the sort of expression Scrooge or Gradgrind would have used :))

b
 

bertietheblue

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1. Have we received the payment of USDxxx from the customer?
2. Did you receive the payment of USDxxx from the customer?
3. Please advise the payment of USDxxx upon receive.

3. should read 'Please confirm payment of the sum of USD xxx upon receipt'

PS: minor point but we use a space after 3-letter ISO (International Orgnaization for Stanadardization) currency codes, so USD xxx, EUR xxx, GBP xxx, etc - maybe this convention is in part because it's clearer than an unbroken sequence of letters and digits (compare [STRIKE]EUR432[/STRIKE] with EUR 432), but 'US$xxx' (without space) is, I think, more common than 'US$ xxx' (with space). You also often see '$' but other countries use that symbol so it's best to be specific if there's a risk of confusion or if writing a formal document and use 'US$' (or indeed 'U.S.$') or 'USD'.
 

emsr2d2

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3. should read 'Please confirm payment of the sum of USD xxx upon receipt'

PS: minor point but we use a space after 3-letter ISO (International Orgnaization for Stanadardization) currency codes, so USD xxx, EUR xxx, GBP xxx, etc - maybe this convention is in part because it's clearer than an unbroken sequence of letters and digits (compare [STRIKE]EUR432[/STRIKE] with EUR 432), but 'US$xxx' (without space) is, I think, more common than 'US$ xxx' (with space). You also often see '$' but other countries use that symbol so it's best to be specific if there's a risk of confusion or if writing a formal document and use 'US$' (or indeed 'U.S.$') or 'USD'.

I've also seen the qualifying initials for the country after the number, if using the $ symbol:

$500 US (American dollars)
$500 HK (Hong Kong dollars)
$500 CAN (Canadian dollars)
 
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