"You have said it."

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Odessa Dawn

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[SUP]25[/SUP]Judas, the one who would betray him, also asked, "Rabbi, am I the one?"
And Jesus told him,
"You have said it."



Having checked the Free Dictionary looking for the meaning of the phrase "You have said it." And
replied. I am pleased that it has been found. However, the auxiliary verb (have) is excluded. The point is that I am looking for the exact meaning of the underlined part, but I am confused since on one hand I have the auxiliary verb (have) while on the other hand it is marginalized. Does the word have occurrence affect the meaning?
 

5jj

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Don't try to analyse the language of the Bible, even in a modern translation.
 

emsr2d2

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This is the second or third time that you have used the word "replied" and turned it into a hyperlink. I don't know what you think it means but a dictionary does not "reply" with a definition. In your example, it would have been better if you had written something like: "Having checked the Free Dictionary for the meaning of the phrase, I found this".
 

~Mav~

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[SUP]25[/SUP]Judas, the one who would betray him, also asked, "Rabbi, am I the one?"
And Jesus told him,
"You have said it."



[...] The point is that I am looking for the exact meaning of the underlined part...

This is a form of affirming/assenting. You could also say, "You said it yourself.", "It is as you (have just) said.", or "You said so.", but I most respectfully suggest that you take 5jj's advice. ;-)​
 

Raymott

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[SUP]25[/SUP]Judas, the one who would betray him, also asked, "Rabbi, am I the one?"
And Jesus told him,
"You have said it."


There are many versions of the Bible. In the New International Version, this line goes, "Jesus answered, 'Yes, it is you.'"
If you're going to quote the Bible asking for the meaning, you need to say where it comes from. This is Matthew 26:25.
If you look at Bible Gateway on the web, it will give you a whole page of translations.
http://www.biblegateway.com/verse/en/Matthew%2026:25
 

BobK

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This is a form of affirming/assenting. You could also say, "You said it yourself.", "It is as you (have just) said.", or "You said so.", but I most respectfully suggest that you take 5jj's advice. ;-)​

Or, in a rather less reverential translation: 'Don't come the raw prawn with me - you know perfectly well it's you'. :)

b
 
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konungursvia

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Don't try to analyse the language of the Bible, even in a modern translation.

I was going to say something like this, but my late dad once did a degree in Hellenistic Greek with the intention of analyzing just that.

Like any work of literature, it can and should be analyzed by those interested in it.

But I think your general hint is correct, that splitting hairs over an English translation of a Hellenistic Greek account of a conversation reported third-hand at best in what was probably Aramaic is somehow missing the point.
 

Raymott

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I was going to say something like this, but my late dad once did a degree in Hellenistic Greek with the intention of analyzing just that.

Like any work of literature, it can and should be analyzed by those interested in it.

But I think your general hint is correct, that splitting hairs over an English translation of a Hellenistic Greek account of a conversation reported third-hand at best in what was probably Aramaic is somehow missing the point.
That's true. But I'm not sure it's all that relevant to someone learning English who wants to understand what Christians believe when they read that passage. Obviously no one knows what Jesus actually said, if he even existed. What OD wants to know, I suspect, is what that phrase is intended to mean by the person who wrote it in English, and what the average native speaker understands by it.
So, in this case, "You have said it" means (at least to some editors of the Bible, and those readers who use their edition), "Yes, that's right", or "Yes it's you".
 
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