You ready for your interview

svetlana14

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Dear all,

I cannot figure out a couple of words. Here is the link. I hear "you ready hear (or here) interview", The context suggests "you ready for your interview" and the original subtitles are the same. Meawhile authomatic subtitles point to "hear"/"here". Can you please listen and tell me what is the right thing. Thank you very much.

P.S. I noted that the mother does not speak Porch.
 

5jj

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He asks "You ready for your interview?"
 

probus

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What does "speak Porch" mean? Nothing to me. Is porch meant to be posh?

I might mention that the mother sounds more convincingly posh in this video than in the last. Perhaps she has learnt to sound posh but her true accent slipped through in the first video. But the whole thing was far too long and boring, so I only heard the first few minutes, switching off when the son started his promo.
 

svetlana14

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He asks "You ready for your interview?"

Could you please play it back. I hear something like "here" between You ready AND for your interview?" so that it is a kind of You ready here for your interview. Please check it again. Thank you.
 

jutfrank

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I'd transcribe it with the auxiliary verb in place:

Are you ready for your interview?

There's nothing at all between ready and for. I can't even imagine what you could possibly be hearing.
 

emsr2d2

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There is absolutely nothing between "ready" and "for". Like jutfrank, I can't imagine what you think you're hearing but it's not there!
 

tzfujimino

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I think svetlana14 meant "you ready hear (or here) interview" in the first post, and not "You ready here for your interview".

I assume his "for your" sounds like "here" to svetlana.
 

jutfrank

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I think svetlana14 meant "you ready hear (or here) interview" in the first post, and not "You ready here for your interview".

I assume his "for your" sounds like "here" to svetlana.

Oh, yes, that makes sense. I see svetlana14 says that clearly enough in post #1. Post #4 was confusing.
 

svetlana14

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Thank you again for paying attention to this question. I really hear "you ready hear (or here) interview." It is interesting that if you turn on automatic subtitles, they catch the phrase as YOU READY HERE INTERVIEW"., which makes no sense. It's clear that automatic subtitles are not reliable translation but they are more or less right if clauses and words are basic ones.
 
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