[Grammar] You've contraction

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DSoldier

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"You've confused me with someone else"


I heard that "You've" has some rules to be used...

Can anyone tell if this sentence is okay to use "You've"?

Thank you all folks in advance

I love this forum!!! o/
 

Tdol

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That's fine.

We generally don't contract when it is a main verb denoting an action- I have lunch at 1pm (= I eat lunch), not [strike]I've lunch at 1pm[/strike].
 

BobK

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That's fine.

We generally don't contract when it is a main verb denoting an action- I have lunch at 1pm (= I eat lunch), not [strike]I've lunch at 1pm[/strike].

Interesting... I agree that when referring to an action, contraction is rare. But when the action is distanced (so that it's not an action really, but a reference to the action) contraction is possible.

Example:
When can we meet?
Any time really, except...[looking at diary] .. except Monday, when I've lunch'


Or... not sure :oops: ... perhaps you'd normally use a noun here - I've a lunch/a meeting/an appointment... :?:

b
 

Raymott

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Interesting... I agree that when referring to an action, contraction is rare. But when the action is distanced (so that it's not an action really, but a reference to the action) contraction is possible.

Example:
When can we meet?
Any time really, except...[looking at diary] .. except Monday, when I've lunch'


Or... not sure :oops: ... perhaps you'd normally use a noun here - I've a lunch/a meeting/an appointment... :?:

b
Never, in AusE, and I suspect in most places. "I've" is only used for complex tenses, or in the irregular present tense verb, "I've got".
 

Tdol

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In BrE, we can contract before nouns sometimes, and in Bob's example it's more possessive than action so it's in an area where we could contract (just about). ;-)
 

DSoldier

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Wow, just stumbled upon what seems to be one tough subject...
I guess I won't need to pay so much attention to that "You've" thing so hard since I'm seeing even experts and natives discussing about it..

But I'll certainly apply that to my writings, now with less fear of writing that in the wrong way.

Thank for all your kind answers!
 

Tdol

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It's a very common verb, with different meanings (action/ownership), can be an auxiliary verb, etc, so add that to the variants spoken and you have a recipe for differences. ;-)
 
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