A & An Drawing Games

Level: Beginner

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Articles

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (99 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

A & An Drawing Games
Instructions for teachers
Cut up one set of cards per class or group of two to four students. Decide if you will keep 
the pairs of 
“a” and “an” things together on one card or cut them up individually, if you will 
keep the 
“a” and “an” attached or cut them off, and if you will use the “It” “is”/ “’s” cards or 
not.

There are several drawing games that you can play with these cards:
-

The teacher or one student draws until the people watching describe it (including the
right article/ in a sentence)

-

Students put together cards with an article/ in a sentence for their partners to draw

-

Students race to draw and write a description of the thing that the teacher or a student
shouts out

All the games can also be played with a pair of things on the same line both being drawn 
at the same time, e.g. drawing an apple and a strawberry and making sure that they use 
the right article to describe each. 

Make sure that you keep all the drawing from the game and ask students to describe all of
them (using the right articles) after you finish. They could then test each other in other 
ways such as raising their right or left hand depending on whether the noun or adjective 
they hear should take 
“a” or “an”

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

1

Cards to cut up

Itis’s

an

apple

a

strawberry

a

melon

an

orange

a

lemon

an

onion

a chocolate bar an

ice cream

a

banana

an

egg

an

omelette

a

pizza

an

almond

a

peanut

a

grape

an

olive

a

fish

an

octopus

an

elephant

a

hippo

a

giraffe

an

ostrich

an

eagle

a

seagull

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

2

an

insect

a

spider

a

hat

an

umbrella

an

alarm clock

a

watch

a

house

an

igloo

an

armchair

a

sofa

an

ear

a

nose

an

eye

a

mouth

an

arm

a

hand

an

elbow

a

knee

an

eyebrow

a

moustache

an

eraser

a

pencil

an exercise book a

textbook

an

airport

a

station

an

ambulance

a

fire engine

an

angry…

a

happy…

an

ill…

a

sad…

an

old…

a

young…

a

cute…

an

ugly…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

3

A and an written practice
One in each pair below needs “a” to be changed to “an”. Put “-n” in the right places. 

a

apple

a

strawberry

a

melon

a

orange

a

lemon

a

onion

a

chocolate bar

a

ice cream

a

banana

a

egg

a

omelette

a

pizza

a

almond

a

peanut

a

grape

a

olive

a

fish

a

octopus

a

elephant

a

hippo

a

giraffe

a

ostrich

a

eagle

a

seagull

a

insect

a

spider

a

hat

a

umbrella

a

alarm clock

a

watch

a

house

a

igloo

a

armchair

a

sofa

a

ear

a

nose

a

eye

a

mouth

a

arm

a

hand

a

elbow

a

knee

a

eyebrow

a

moustache

a

eraser

a

pencil

a

exercise book

a

textbook

a

airport

a

station

a

ambulance

a

fire engine

a

angry…

a

happy…

a

ill…

a

sad…

a

old…

a

young…

a

cute…

a

ugly…

Hint: One on each line above needs to be changed. The other one on each line should stay as “a”

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

4