Academic Discussions- Cultural Differences and Useful Phrases

A LESSON PLAN FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHERS

Level: Advanced
Grammar Topic: Vocabulary
Type: Lesson Plans
Submitted by:
Published: 2nd Mar 2018

Below is a preview of the 'Academic Discussions- Cultural Differences and Useful Phrases' lesson plan and is automatically generated from the PDF file. While it will look close to the original, there may be formatting differences. It's provided to allow you to view the content of the lesson plan before you download the file.

      Page: /

Lesson Plan Text

There are phrases which can soften the negative impact of a strong opinion by warning the
other person that a strong opinion is coming (“To be frank,…”, “Not many people will agree
with me, but…”, etc).

In academic discussions, you should avoid stating your opinion without supporting what 
you say (so you have to say “I’m sure that… because…”, not just “I’m sure that…”, etc).

The best ways of supporting your arguments include quoting data and trends (“Recent 
statistics from… show that…”, “There has been a 300% increase in…”, etc), quoting other 
people’s opinions and experiences (“Chomsky says that…”, “All the speakers at a 
conference I went to last year agreed that…”, etc), knocking down opposing arguments 
(“Although many people believe that…”, “It could also be said that…, but this doesn’t mean
that…”, etc), and logical arguments such as cause and effect (“This would inevitably lead 
to…”, “The result of this is likely to be…”, etc). 

Unlike most academic writing, it’s okay to use personal experience to support your 
arguments in academic discussions (“I have found that…”, “In my limited experience”, “I 
usually find that…”, etc).

Direct disagreement phrases are rare in academic discussions (so we don’t often say “I 
disagree”, “I don’t agree”, etc). 

The most common way of disagreeing in academic discussions is with a positive 
statement then “but” (“I see what you mean, but don’t you think…?”, “That’s a good point, 
but it could also be said that…”, “I used to feel that way, but recently I read that…”, etc). 

Instead of disagreeing directly, in academic discussions it’s common to ask the other 
person to expand on their views (“Hmmm, what makes you say that?”, “What are you 
basing that on?”, “Do you have any data on that?”, “Can you unpack that for me?”, etc).

Hedging and generalising cultural differences and useful phrases
In academic discussions (as in academic writing), we need to be very careful not to 
overgeneralise (so don’t say just “Japanese people think…”, “It is thought that…”, etc). 

To not overgeneralise, in academic discussions we often add information on how many or 
how much something matches our statement, for example how many people something is 
true for (“almost everyone”, “the vast majority of people”, “most people”, “many people”, “a 
considerable/ substantial number of people”, “some people”, etc).

To avoid overgeneralising, in academic discussions we often add information on how often
something is true or happens (“almost always”, “usually/ generally”, “often/ regularly”, 
“sometimes”, “occasionally”, etc).

So that we don’t overgeneralise, in academic discussions we often add information on how
likely something is to be true or to happen (“almost certainly”, “very probably”, “probably”, 
“possibly”, “conceivably”, etc).

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

4

Giving opinions cultural differences and useful phrases
There is a clear difference between strong opinion phrases (______________________
______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________) 
and weak opinion phrases (________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Pronunciation can make an opinion phrase stronger or weaker (___________________ vs
____________________________ vs _____________________________________
or _______________________________ vs _________________________________ vs
_______________________________________________________________________).

There are phrases which can soften the negative impact of a strong opinion by warning the
other person that a strong opinion is coming (__________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________).

The best ways of supporting your arguments include quoting data and trends (__________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________),
quoting other people’s opinions and experiences (_______________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________),
knocking down opposing arguments (________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________),
and logical arguments such as cause and effect (_______________________________
______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Unlike most academic writing, it’s okay to use personal experience to support your 
arguments in academic discussions (_______________________________________
______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

The most common way of disagreeing in academic discussions is with a positive 
statement then “but” (______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Instead of disagreeing directly, in academic discussions it’s common to ask the other 
person to expand on their views (__________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

6

Terms of Use

Lesson plans & worksheets can be used by teachers without any fee in the classroom; however, please ensure you keep all copyright information and references to UsingEnglish.com in place.

You will need Adobe Reader to view these files.

Get Adobe Reader