Academic English- British and American English

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (108 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

How British is your Academic English?

Student’s instructions
Without looking at the list below, listen to your teacher define some words and expressions
etc and write the form that you would most often use. When there is more than one option,
write only the thing you use most or would be most likely to use, i.e. one thing only. If 
there’s anything you have no idea about, leave it blank until you hear the options at the 
second stage.

Compare with your partner, but only change what you have written if you are sure it is 
actually wrong as there are many possible answers. 

Listen again but this time with options to choose from. Choose just one option, only 
changing your mind from the previous round if you are sure you would use that other thing
more often. If you’ve never used any of the options, just choose the one you like the sound
of.

What is the distinction between the two options each time?

Compare with your partner again. Who do you think has more British English? 

Check which is which as a class and see if you were right about who had more British 
English. 

Do the same for spelling, making sure you still write only the form that you would use more
often. 

Compare your answers in pairs and then as a class. Which of you had more British 
spelling and which had more American spelling?

What are the general patterns in the words that you have checked your answers to?

Try to think of other British/ American spelling differences, e.g. other examples of the 
differences above. You get one point for each correct difference, and two points for any 
which are particularly academic.

Your teacher will read out some other words from their list. You get one point for each 
correct statement you can make about spelling, variations, other parts of speech etc about
those words, but play passes to another person or group if you say anything wrong. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

How British is your Academic English – Teacher’s Script 
Choose between 15 and 20 from the lists below to dictate to your class, following the 
instructions on the Student’s Instructions sheet above. The ones in bold below are British. 
Part One: Academic Vocabulary
People

A new undergraduate student –first year student/ fresher/ freshman

A student in the year after that – second year student/ sophomore

Someone who continues studying after they finish their first degree – grad student/ 
graduate student/ postgrad student/ postgraduate student

The normal way to address a basic-level lecturer – Doctor + family name/ Professor
+ family name

A group noun for the people who have teaching and research roles in the university –
academic staff/ faculty 

Places

The first school you go to, after kindergarten – elementary school/ primary school

The opposite of a private school – public school/ state school (a British “public 
school” is a very expensive and historic private school)

Accommodation for students – dorm/ dormitory/ halls/ student halls

Times

The periods that academic years are divided up into – semester/ term

The time between lessons – break/ recess

The document telling you when your classes are – schedule/ timetable

A special period with no work, e.g. Xmas – holiday/ vacation

Testing

Much less important and/ or much shorter than an exam – quiz/ test

A symbol that means you got the answer right, the opposite of a cross – check/ check
mark/ tick

Look at what you have studied in order to remember it, perhaps before an exam – 
review/  revise 

Work that needs to be done before the next lesson – assignment/ homework

A number or letter representing how well you did your work, e.g. “B+”, “distinction” or 
“63%” – grade/ mark

Miscellaneous

Money you have to pay for being taught – tuition/ tuition fees

A common abbreviation of “mathematics” – math/ maths

Another word for the most common meaning of “quite” – fairly/ very

Fill ______ a form – in/ out

Enrol(l) _______ a course – in/ on

Places where you can stay such as an apartment or a hotel – accommodation/ ac-
commodations

The punctuation mark used at the end of a statement – full stop/ period

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Part Two: Academic Punctuation

The short forms of “mister”, “misses” and “doctor” – Mr Mrs Dr/ Mr. Mrs. Dr.

The walls were coated with wallpaper, paint and tiles./  The walls were coated 
with wallpaper, paint, and tiles.

The man stopped: he had forgotten his hat./ The man stopped: He had forgotten 
his hat. 

The performance took place on the second of February 2006. – The performance 
took place on 2 February 2006
./ The performance took place on February 2, 2006. 

(For further discussion see Richardson's excellent analysis (1999) and Danneb-
urger's survey (2000))/
 (For further discussion see Richardson's excellent analysis 
[1999] and Danneburger's survey [2000])

Part Three: Spelling of Academic Word List vocabulary
Choose at least ten from the list below, making sure there are at least two of each kind if 
you want them to go on and make generalisations. You can define the words, give the root
forms, or just dictate the words. The first in each pair is British. Note that –ize and –ization 
are also fine in British English – the point is included here because –ise and –isation is 
more common and it brings out lots of lovely academic vocabulary. 

-ae/ -e

A book or CD ROM that has factual entries on almost everything, e.g. Britannica and 
Encarta – encyclopaedia/ encyclopedia

anaemia/ anemia

anaesthesia/ anesthesia

orthopaedic/ orthopedic

paediatric/ pediatric

-ise/ - ize and –isation/ - ization

Another way to say “use” – utilise/ utilize, utilisation/ utilization

Free up, get rid of restrictions such as red tape – liberalise/ liberalize, liberalisation, lib-
eralization

Put into order by how important they are – prioritise/ prioritize, prioritisation/ prioritiza-
tion

The increasing interconnectedness and independency across borders – globalise/ 
globalize, globalisation/ globalization 

To list – itemise/ itemize, itemisation/ itemization

category – categorise/ categorize, categorisation/ categorization 

colony – colonise/ colonize, colonisation/ colonization 

computer – computerise/ computerize, computerisation/ computerization 

concept – conceptualise/ conceptualize, conceptualisation/ conceptualization

context – contextualise/ contextualize, contextualisation/ contextualization 

drama – dramatise/ dramatize, dramatisation/ dramatization

external –externalise/ externalize, externalisation/ externalization

institute –institutionalise/ institutionalize, institutionalisation/ institutionalization 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

internal – internalise/ internalize, internalisation/ internalization 

maximum – maximise/ maximize, maximisation, maximization

minimal – minimise/ minimize, minimisation/ minimization

neutral – neutralise/ neutralize, neutralisation, neutralization

normal – normalise/ normalize, normalisation/ normalization

rational – rationalise/ rationalize, rationalisation/ rationalization

stable – stabilise/ stabilize, stabilisation/ stabilization

standard – standardise/ standardize, standardisation/ standardization

visual – visualise/ visualize, visualisation/ visualization

(Just) -ise/ -ize

Cause a huge change or improvement – revolutionise/ revolutionize

emphasis – emphasise/ emphasize 

final – finalise/ finalize

hypothesis –hypothesise/ hypothesize

philosophy – philosophise/ philosophize

recognition – recognise/ recognize

summary – summarise/ summarize

symbol – symbolise/ symbolize

-ll/ -l

channelled/ channeled

counsellor/ counselor, counselling/ counseling 

equalling/ equaling

initialled/ initialed

labelled/ labeled 

libellous/ libelous

modelling/ modeling

panellist/ panelist

signalling/ signaling

-our/ -or

A word meaning manual work that is also the name of the main centre-left party in the 
UK – labour/ labor

The person who lives in the house next to yours – neighbour/ neighbor

behave – behaviour/ behavior

-re/ -er

One hundredth of a metre – centimetre/ centimeter

There are 330 in a small water bottle – millilitre/ milliliter

fibre/ fiber

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014