Academic English- Countable and Uncountable Nouns

A LESSON PLAN FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHERS

Level: Intermediate
Grammar Topic: Nouns
Type: Lesson Plans
Submitted by:
Published: 7th Sep 2015

Below is a preview of the 'Academic English- Countable and Uncountable Nouns' lesson plan and is automatically generated from the PDF file. While it will look close to the original, there may be formatting differences. It's provided to allow you to view the content of the lesson plan before you download the file.

      Page: /

Lesson Plan Text

paragraphing

the paraphrasing

the permission

persuasiveness

plagiarism

the planning

the prior knowledge

the proofreading

punctuation

readability

the research proposal

rhetorical questions

section headings

the semi-colon

submitting

support for your opinion

sources

stages

the technical terms

the terminology

topics

underlining

Hint: there are 8 G/ S ones. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Suggested answers

abbreviations – G 

abstracts – G 

the academic journals – S

the academic reference – G/ S

academic vocabulary – G 

the acronyms – S 

the advice – S 

the bracket – G/ S 

buzzwords – G 

brainstorming – G 

chapters – G 

conclusions – G 

contractions – G 

counterarguments – G 

deadlines – G 

definitions – G 

diagrams – G 

documents – G 

editing – G 

errors – G 

the undergraduate essay – G/ S 

the evidence – S 

the examples – S 

the experts – S 

facts – G 

feedback – G 

the final draft – G/ S 

the footnote – G/ S 

formatting rules – G 

fundamental terms – G 

the gaps in the research – S 

goals – G 

the guidance – S 

hedging – G 

implications of research – G 

the importance – S 

key words – G 

the mind map – G/ S 

minority views – G 

mistakes – G 

the objectivity – S 

originality – G 

paragraphing – G 

the paraphrasing – S 

the permission – S 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

objectivity

originality

paragraphing

paraphrasing

permission

persuasiveness

plagiarism

planning

prior knowledge

proofreading

punctuation

readability

(research) proposal

rhetorical question

section heading

semi-colon

submitting

support for opinions

source

stage

technical term

terminology

topic

underlining

Look above to help, then check your answers as a class. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

6

Analysing countable and uncountable nouns

Without looking above for now, brainstorm examples words that end with these suffixes 
and then identify if they are associated with countable nouns (C), uncountable nouns (U) 
or both (C/U). Write the words with an “s” if that is possible. If you aren’t sure, try putting 
“some” in front of the noun and see if “s” is also necessary. 

Note that some words that end with these things are not examples of suffixes, e.g. “sing” 
is not “s” + “ing”. 

-ing

-sion/-tion

-ity

-ance/ -ence

-ment

-ness

-ism

-ology

Look back at the earlier worksheets to help with this activity.

Underline U or C if one of those two is more common. 

Check your answers with the next page. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

7

Matching countable and uncountable nouns

Try to think of countable words which have more or less the same meaning as the 
uncountable words given below or are countable examples of that thing. There were some
examples in the worksheets above, but many other answers are possible. There may also 
be uncountable synonyms or examples, but please also include countable ones. 

academic literature 

advice/ guidance 

brainstorming 

editing 

evidence/ support 

homework 

importance of the research 

jargon/ terminology 

persuasiveness 

plagiarism 

planning 

prior knowledge 

proofreading 

punctuation 

readability 

research 

vocabulary 

Look at the previous worksheets for more ideas. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Academic Word List – countable and uncountable nouns word formation

Write “some” in front of all the words below and use the same ending with each of the 
words in each of the sections below to make all of them into countable or uncountable 
nouns, including an “s” if that is possible. If the root word is already a noun, try to make 
another noun out of it (you can’t just add an s).

accessible 
available 
compatible 
complex 

achieve 
assign 
require 

arbitrary 
aware 
inappropriate 

cite 
equate 
quote 

compensate 
concentrate 
cooperate 
deviate 

constitute 
corporate 
institute 
locate 

correspond 
emerge 
rely 

differentiate 
discriminate 
distort 

displace 
enforce 
equip 
involve

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Terms of Use

Lesson plans & worksheets can be used by teachers without any fee in the classroom; however, please ensure you keep all copyright information and references to UsingEnglish.com in place.

You will need Adobe Reader to view these files.

Get Adobe Reader