Academic English- Countable and Uncountable Nouns

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Nouns

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (151 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Academic English- Countable and Uncountable Nouns Review

(Using nouns with general and specific meanings/ Determiners with countable and 
uncountable nouns/ Useful vocabulary for talking about academic writing/ 
Countable and uncountable nouns word formation/ Advice on academic writing)

1

Error correction

In each pair of sentences below, which phrase has a general meaning (G) and which is 
wrong (X)? “G” means a statement about things in general such as all such things or the 
whole world. 

Academic papers tend to be filled with difficult words.

Academic literatures tend to be filled with jargons.

An interesting result can be obtained from a survey like this.

An interesting information can be produced by a research like this.

Job provides wage. 

Labour produces wealth.

Mammal replaced dinosaur. 

The mammal replaced the dinosaur.

2

Identifying general statements from the grammar and context

In each pair of sentences below, which could be used to make a general statement (G) 
and which could only be talking about specific/ particular things (S)? There are no 
mistakes this time.

Research papers are published in academic journals

The research papers are published in the academic journals.

The dog has long lived together with the human. 

The advice became part of the legislation. 

Software has transformed technology.

The software has transformed the technology. 

The employee has a duty to protect the corporation.

The aforementioned employee has a duty to protect the corporation.

There is a new law about that due by the end of this parliament.

A law must be passed by both houses of parliament.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

3

Language analysis

Circle the countable nouns and underline the uncountable nouns above. 

Make rules by adding determiners and/ or “s” or nothing to the nouns below and labelling 
the result with G for general, S for specific or G/ S when both meanings are possible 
(depending on the context).

+ countable noun +

+ countable noun + 

+ countable noun +
+ countable noun +

+ uncountable noun +
+ uncountable noun +

Hint: The things you can add are “a/ an”, “the” and “s”, sometimes in combination. One 
has nothing added to it. 

Which structures are not possible with countable and uncountable nouns?

NOT

+ countable noun +

+ countable noun + 

+ uncountable noun +
+ uncountable noun +

Compare with the answers below the fold.  

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Suggested answers

countable noun + s – G

a/ an + countable noun – G/ S

the + countable noun – G/S

the + countable noun + s – S

uncountable noun – G

the + uncountable noun – S

NOT 

a + countable noun + s

countable noun (just countable noun with nothing added)

a + uncountable noun

uncountable noun + s

Find examples of each of the correct ones above in the example sentences on the first 
page. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

4

Identifying general statements from the grammar

Does each noun below have a general meaning (G), or a specific meaning (S), or is either 
meaning possible depending on the context (G/S)? There are no errors this time. 

abbreviations

abstracts

the academic journals

the academic reference

academic vocabulary

the acronyms

the advice

the bracket

buzzwords

brainstorming

chapters

conclusions

contractions

counterarguments

deadlines

definitions

diagrams

documents

editing

errors

the undergraduate essay

the evidence

the examples

the experts

facts

feedback

the final draft

the footnote

formatting rules

fundamental terms

the gaps in the research

goals

the guidance

hedging

implications of research

the importance

key words

the mind map

minority views

mistakes

the objectivity

originality

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

paragraphing

the paraphrasing

the permission

persuasiveness

plagiarism

the planning

the prior knowledge

the proofreading

punctuation

readability

the research proposal

rhetorical questions

section headings

the semi-colon

submitting

support for your opinion

sources

stages

the technical terms

the terminology

topics

underlining

Hint: there are 8 G/ S ones. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Suggested answers

abbreviations – G 

abstracts – G 

the academic journals – S

the academic reference – G/ S

academic vocabulary – G 

the acronyms – S 

the advice – S 

the bracket – G/ S 

buzzwords – G 

brainstorming – G 

chapters – G 

conclusions – G 

contractions – G 

counterarguments – G 

deadlines – G 

definitions – G 

diagrams – G 

documents – G 

editing – G 

errors – G 

the undergraduate essay – G/ S 

the evidence – S 

the examples – S 

the experts – S 

facts – G 

feedback – G 

the final draft – G/ S 

the footnote – G/ S 

formatting rules – G 

fundamental terms – G 

the gaps in the research – S 

goals – G 

the guidance – S 

hedging – G 

implications of research – G 

the importance – S 

key words – G 

the mind map – G/ S 

minority views – G 

mistakes – G 

the objectivity – S 

originality – G 

paragraphing – G 

the paraphrasing – S 

the permission – S 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

persuasiveness – G 

plagiarism – G 

the planning – S 

the prior knowledge – S 

the proofreading – S 

punctuation – G 

readability – G 

the research proposal – G/ S 

rhetorical questions – G 

section headings – G 

the semi-colon – G/ S 

submitting – G 

support for your opinion – G 

sources – G 

stages – G 

the technical terms – S 

the terminology – S

topics – G 

underlining – G 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

5

Identifying countable and uncountable nouns

Without looking above for now, add “some” and a final “s” to the countable nouns below
and just “some” to the uncountable nouns (because a final “s” is impossible). You can use
your grammar knowledge, the endings of the words, what you remember from above, or
just what sounds right. If you want to check, try adding a number, “many”, “much”, “a”, etc
and see if they sound okay. If not, the noun in uncountable. 

abbreviation

abstract

academic journal

academic reference

academic vocabulary

acronym

advice

bracket

buzzword

brainstorming

chapter

conclusion

contraction

counterargument

deadline

definition

diagram

document

editing

error

undergraduate essay

evidence

example

expert

fact

feedback

final draft

footnote

formatting rule

fundamental term

gap (in the research)

goal

guidance

hedging

implication

importance

key word

mind map

minority view

mistake

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

objectivity

originality

paragraphing

paraphrasing

permission

persuasiveness

plagiarism

planning

prior knowledge

proofreading

punctuation

readability

(research) proposal

rhetorical question

section heading

semi-colon

submitting

support for opinions

source

stage

technical term

terminology

topic

underlining

Look above to help, then check your answers as a class. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

6

Analysing countable and uncountable nouns

Without looking above for now, brainstorm examples words that end with these suffixes 
and then identify if they are associated with countable nouns (C), uncountable nouns (U) 
or both (C/U). Write the words with an “s” if that is possible. If you aren’t sure, try putting 
“some” in front of the noun and see if “s” is also necessary. 

Note that some words that end with these things are not examples of suffixes, e.g. “sing” 
is not “s” + “ing”. 

-ing

-sion/-tion

-ity

-ance/ -ence

-ment

-ness

-ism

-ology

Look back at the earlier worksheets to help with this activity.

Underline U or C if one of those two is more common. 

Check your answers with the next page. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Suggested answers
Note that there may be examples of other forms that are not above. 
-ing – C/U
brainstorming
editing
hedging
headings
paragraphing
paraphrasing
planning
proofreading
submitting
underlining

-sion/-tion – C/ U
abbreviations
conclusions
contractions
definitions
implications of the research
permission
punctuation

-ity – U
objectivity
originality
readability

-ance/ -ence – C/ U
references
evidence
guidance
importance

-ment - C
counterarguments
documents

-ness - U
persuasiveness

-ism - U
plagiarism

-ology - U
terminology

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

7

Matching countable and uncountable nouns

Try to think of countable words which have more or less the same meaning as the 
uncountable words given below or are countable examples of that thing. There were some
examples in the worksheets above, but many other answers are possible. There may also 
be uncountable synonyms or examples, but please also include countable ones. 

academic literature 

advice/ guidance 

brainstorming 

editing 

evidence/ support 

homework 

importance of the research 

jargon/ terminology 

persuasiveness 

plagiarism 

planning 

prior knowledge 

proofreading 

punctuation 

readability 

research 

vocabulary 

Look at the previous worksheets for more ideas. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Match the words below to the words above. When there is more than one, it can go in 
more than one place above. 

academic journals
active verb forms
brackets
calculations
colons
corrections
emails 
examples
facts
facts
figures
fundamental terms
grammatical errors
ideas
implications
mind maps
mind maps
paragraph plans 
paragraphs with one clear topic
questionnaires
quotes without attribution
recommendations
rhetorical questions
section headings
semi colons
short sentences
spelling mistakes
stages
statistics
statistics 
surveys
technical terms
tips
undergraduate essays
words

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Suggested answers
academic literature – academic journals
advice/ guidance – recommendations/ tips
brainstorming – mind maps/ ideas
editing – corrections
evidence/ support – statistics/ figures/ examples/ facts
homework – undergraduate essays
importance of the research – implications
jargon/ terminology – technical terms/ fundamental terms
persuasiveness – rhetorical questions
plagiarism – quotes without attribution
planning – stages/ mind maps/ paragraph plans 
prior knowledge – facts/ statistics/ 
proofreading – spelling mistakes/ grammatical errors
punctuation – semi colons/ colons/ brackets
readability – short sentences/ active verb forms/ paragraphs with one clear topic/ section 
headings
research – questionnaires/ surveys/ calculations
vocabulary – words

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

8

Countable and uncountable nouns with general and specific meanings speaking
– Definitions and advice on academic writing

Choose one of the words below, define it and then give your advice on that topic and/ or 
using that word. Does your partner understand and agree with your advice. 
abbreviation
abstract
academic journal
academic reference
academic vocabulary
acronym
advice
bracket
buzzword
brainstorming
chapter
conclusion
contraction
counterargument
deadline
definition
diagram
document
editing
error
undergraduate essay
evidence
example
expert
fact
feedback
final draft
footnote
formatting rule
fundamental term
gap in the research
goal
guidance
hedging
implication of the research
importance
key word
mind map
minority view
mistake
objectivity
originality
paragraphing

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

paraphrasing
permission
persuasiveness
plagiarism
planning
prior knowledge
proofreading
punctuation
readability
research proposal
rhetorical question
section heading
semi-colon
submitting
support for your opinion
source
stage
technical term
terminology
topic
underlining

9

Countable and uncountable nouns with general and specific meanings speaking
– Comparing words to speak about academic writing

Compare and contrast the words on one line below and see if your partners agree with 
what you say. 
abbreviation/ acronym/ contraction
abstract/ summary
academic journal/ magazine
academic reference/ non-academic reference
academic vocabulary/ non-academic vocabulary
round bracket/ square bracket
buzzword/ key word
chapter/ section/ paragraph
conclusion/ summary
definition/ explanation
diagram/ figure
editing/ proofreading
undergraduate essay/ published paper
feedback/ correction
footnotes/ appendices
paraphrasing/ summarizing
rhetorical question/ ordinary question
semi-colon/ colon/ hyphen
jargon/ ordinary language

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Academic Word List – countable and uncountable nouns word formation

Write “some” in front of all the words below and use the same ending with each of the 
words in each of the sections below to make all of them into countable or uncountable 
nouns, including an “s” if that is possible. If the root word is already a noun, try to make 
another noun out of it (you can’t just add an s).

accessible 
available 
compatible 
complex 

achieve 
assign 
require 

arbitrary 
aware 
inappropriate 

cite 
equate 
quote 

compensate 
concentrate 
cooperate 
deviate 

constitute 
corporate 
institute 
locate 

correspond 
emerge 
rely 

differentiate 
discriminate 
distort 

displace 
enforce 
equip 
involve

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

diverse 
flexible
illegal 
inevitable 

educate 
exploit 
implement 

expansion 
liberal 
professional 

fund 
network 
offset 
paragraph 

imprecise 
integrate 
isolate 

inform 
liberalise 
restore 

intense 
neutral 
objective 
uniform 

legislate 
manipulate 
mediate 

random 
responsive 
unique 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Suggested answers
Uncountable
-ance/ -ence
correspond – some correspondence
emerge – some emergence
rely – some reliance

-ation
educate – some education
exploit – some exploitation
implement – some implementation

inform – some information
liberalise – some liberalisation
restore – some restoration

-ing
fund – some funding
network – some networking
offset – some offsetting
paragraph – some paragraphing

-ion
compensate – some compensation
concentrate – some concentration
cooperate – some cooperation
deviate – some deviation

differentiate – some differentiation
discriminate – some discrimination
distort – some distortion

imprecise – some imprecision
integrate – some integration
isolate – some isolation

legislate – some legislation
manipulate – some manipulation
mediate – some mediation

-ism
expansion – expansionism
liberal – liberalism
professional – professionalism

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

-ity
accessible – some accessibility
available – some availability
compatible – some compatibility
complex – some complexity

diverse – some diversity
flexible – some flexibility
illegal – some illegality
inevitable – some inevitability

intense – some intensity
neutral – some neutrality
objective – some objectivity
uniform – some uniformity

-ment
displace – some displacement
enforce – some enforcement
equip – some equipment
involve – some involvement

-ness
arbitrary – some arbitrariness
aware – some awareness
inappropriate – some inappropriateness

random – some randomness
responsive – responsiveness
unique – some uniqueness

Countable
-ations
cite – some citations
equate – equations
quote – some quotations

-ions
constitute – some constitutions 
corporate – some corporations
institute – some institutions
locate – some locations

-ments
achieve – some achievements
assign – some assignments
require – some requirements

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Countable and uncountable nouns and defining your terms writing task – 
Fundamental terms in my field

Plan and write an essay on “Important terms in my field”. Note the plural S in the title, but 
how many terms you choose to explain is up to you as long as you write about at least 
two. Brainstorm and organise the information into two or three main paragraphs (= 
paragraphs in the body) below before you start, making sure that all things in one 
paragraph are related to each other and that a new paragraph means a new topic. 

The essay should be written for people outside your field, explaining things that they are 
unlikely to know in terms that they can easily understand. Please include the planning 
stages below when you submit your essay. You also need to write an introduction, but a 
final summary or conclusion shouldn’t be necessary.

Brainstorming

Paragraph plan (= one sentence description of the topic of each paragraph of the 
main body of the essay)

Main paragraph 1: 
___________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

Main paragraph 2: 
___________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

Main paragraph 3: (optional) 
___________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________

Now write your essay. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015