Academic English- Leading seminars & discussions review

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Functions & Text

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (208 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Academic English- Leading seminars/discussions review
Work in groups of three or four. Choose one of the questions below and ask your partners
to discuss it, giving any other instructions which you like. Try to make sure it is a good
discussion, but leave all the actual discussion mostly or totally up to the other people
in your group
. Try to make sure they all contribute and come to some kind of conclusion
which can be reported back to the whole class later, and keep the discussion as close
to exactly five minutes as possible
. Please time the discussion. 

Successful student discussion in class

Unsuccessful student discussion in class

The best structures for a class with student discussion

How to make sure all students contribute to a class

The best follow up to a discussion-based class

How to judge if a discussion-based class has been successful or not

Preparing for/ Planning a discussion-based class

Controlling student discussion

How to deal with Japanese students in discussion-based classes

How to deal with foreign students in discussion-based classes

Giving students the language they need to discuss in class in English

How students should prepare for discussion-based classes

Using case studies in class

Putting students in charge of classroom discussion

Classroom discussion with students with low language levels

Classroom discussions with students with mixed language levels

Giving feedback after discussions/ seminars

Ask the whole class about any topics above which you are particularly interested in. 

How well did you all control the discussions when it was your turn? How could you have
done so better?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

What things does someone controlling a discussion need to do (before, during and after
the discussion)? What language can they use to do those things? 

Put   the   language   that   you   are   given   into   categories   by   finding   phrases   which   have
basically the same function, like the things you just spoke about, then match those cards
to these categories:
Getting everyone’s attention/ Starting

Social expressions at the beginning of the seminar/ discussion

Giving the topic of the discussion

Providing background on the topic

Giving instructions/ Explaining the organisation of the discussion/ agenda

General instructions/ Overall instructions

First

Second/ Next

Finally

Explaining the aim of the discussion/ Giving the reason(s) for the discussion

Really getting started

Interrupting and keeping students on topic

Interrupting and getting students to contribute

Moving the discussion on/ Hurrying students up

Starting other parts of the session

Bringing the discussion together/ Discussing as a whole class

Summarising/ Drawing a conclusion from the discussion

Giving and leading feedback on the discussions

Talking about future actions

Ending

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Cards to cut up
Right. It’s nine o’clock (already), so…

Well, there are (still) two or three people missing but… 

Welcome to… 

You all look (very) keen and ready to… 

As you (already) know, what we are going to talk about (today) is… 

The topic of today’s session is… 

According to… 

Many countries/ governments… 

Today’s task is to… 

Please make sure that you... 

I plan to begin today’s session with… 

First (of all), I’ll set out… 

Secondly, I’m going to get you to… 

And then I’ll ask each group to… 

After all that, we’ll… 

We’ll finish with… 

The reason (why) I want to discuss this is to… 

Through this discussion I hope you can… 

So, as I explained, let’s begin by… 

(name) , maybe we can start off by… 

Sorry for interrupting, but… 

Can I stop you there and…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Before you go on, can we hear… 

Excuse the interruption, but I don’t think we’ve… 

Quickly finish that stage and then… 

Just one minute… 

Moving onto… 

We seem to have finished that stage, so… 

Can you report back on… 

Let’s go round (group by group) and… 

So, to sum up what people have… 

The consensus… 

You should have… 

I was impressed by… 

We’ll carry on this discussion… 

Please write a summary of your position and… 

We (seem to) have run out of time so… 

Thanks for… 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Suggested matches with space for brainstorming
Check your answers to the task above below then brainstorm more phrases with the same
functions into the spaces given. 
Getting everyone’s attention/ Starting
Right. It’s nine o’clock (already), so…
Well, there are (still) two or three people missing but… 

Social expressions at the beginning of the seminar/ discussion
Welcome to… 
You all look (very) keen and ready to… 

Giving the topic of the discussion
As you (already) know, what we are going to talk about (today) is… 
The topic of today’s session is… 

Providing background on the topic
According to… 
Many countries/ governments… 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Giving instructions/ Explaining the organisation of the discussion/ agenda
General instructions/ Overall instructions
Today’s task is to… 
Please make sure that you... 

First
I plan to begin today’s session with… 
First (of all), I’ll set out… 

Second/ Next
Secondly, I’m going to get you to… 
And then I’ll ask each group to… 

Finally
After all that, we’ll… 
We’ll finish with… 

Explaining the aim of the discussion/ Giving the reason(s) for the discussion
The reason (why) I want to discuss this is to… 
Through this discussion I hope you can… 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Really getting started
So, as I explained, let’s begin by… 
(name) , maybe we can start off by… 

Interrupting and keeping students on topic
Sorry for interrupting, but… 
Can I stop you there and…

Interrupting and getting students to contribute
Before you go on, can we hear… 
Excuse the interruption, but I don’t think we’ve… 

Moving the discussion on/ Hurrying students up
Quickly finish that stage and then… 
Just one minute… 

Starting other parts of the session
Moving onto… 
We seem to have finished that stage, so… 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Bringing the discussion together/ Discussing as a whole class
Can you report back on… 
Let’s go round (group by group) and… 

Summarising/ Drawing a conclusion from the discussion
So, to sum up what people have… 
The consensus… 

Giving and leading feedback on the discussions
You should have… 
I was impressed by… 

Talking about future actions
We’ll carry on this discussion… 
Please write a summary of your position and… 

Ending
We (seem to) have run out of time so… 
Thanks for… 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

First
I plan to begin today’s session with… 
First (of all), I’ll set out… 
Before the discussion, you have five minutes to… 
We’ll start off with… 
For the first ten minutes... 
In order to do this, you need to split into… 
Second/ Next
Secondly, I’m going to get you to… 
And then I’ll ask each group to… 
After that, I’ll… 
Then, we’ll… 
Finally
After all that, we’ll… 
We’ll finish with… 
Last (of all),… 
The last stage will be…
If we have time, we’ll (also)… 
Explaining the aim of the discussion/ Giving the reason(s) for the discussion
The reason (why) I want to discuss this is to… 
Through this discussion I hope you can… 
By the end of today’s session, we should have… 
Really getting started
So, as I explained, let’s begin by… 
(name) , maybe we can start off by… 
(name), would you like to… 
So, please get into… 
So, please listen carefully and… 
Interrupting and keeping students on topic
Sorry for interrupting, but… 
Can I stop you there and…
Sorry for not letting you finish, but… 
Could I interrupt you (for just a moment)? I’m afraid… 
I’ll let you finish (in a minute), but… 
Interrupting and getting students to contribute
Before you go on, can we hear… 
Excuse the interruption, but I don’t think we’ve… 
Before you continue, does anyone else… 
Thanks for your contribution, but… 
Moving the discussion on/ Hurrying students up
Quickly finish that stage and then… 
Just one minute… 
Let’s not get stuck on… 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Starting other parts of the session
Moving onto… 
We seem to have finished that stage, so… 
Turning to…
If no one has anything (else) to add at this stage,… 
It’s (about) time to… 
We’re running out of time, so… 
In the final ten minutes, let’s… 
Hopefully you’ve (all) finished… 
By now you should have… 
Bringing the discussion together/ Discussing as a whole class
Can you report back on… 
Let’s go round (group by group) and… 
What did you…?
Summarising/ Drawing a conclusion from the discussion
So, to sum up what people have… 
The consensus… 
People’s views are (quite) different but… 
To summarise… 
Giving and leading feedback on the discussions
You should have… 
I was impressed by… 
You were supposed to… 
Next time, I would suggest… 
Next week, really try to… 
Talking about future actions
We’ll carry on this discussion… 
Please write a summary of your position and… 
Please use what you have learnt today when… 
I’ll send individual written feedback… 
Your marks will be posted… 
Ending
We (seem to) have run out of time so… 
Thanks for… 
See you… 

Choose the most useful phrases above for starting your own discussion-based lessons/ 
seminars.

Starting with those, brainstorm endings for the phrases above.

Compare your ideas with the ideas below. Many more ideas are possible. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Starting – Full suggested answers with sentence continuations
Getting everyone’s attention/ Starting
Right. It’s nine o’clock (already), so… let’s get started, shall we?
Well, there are (still) two or three people missing but… I think we should begin…
Okay, (I think) everybody’s here, so…shall we make a start?
Social expressions at the beginning of the seminar/ discussion
Welcome to… the first in a series of…/ the (new) course on/ our (new) English language…
You all look (very) keen and ready to… get started./ get your teeth into this debate./ come
to terms with this (rather) tricky point.
Thanks for coming to… this special English language seminar./ this (one-off) debate on…
I’m glad to see everyone came back after… that heavy discussion last week!/ the break!
Giving the topic of the discussion
As you know, what we are going to talk about is… the alternative explanations of why…
The topic of today’s session is… the hypothesis that…
What I’d like to discuss (today) is… the influence on (modern) life of…
Today’s subject is… what can be done about…
Providing background on the topic
According to… (a majority of the) experts in this area,…/ the (well-known) proverb,…/ 16

th

century thinkers,…/ (name)’s theory of…
Many countries/ governments… have a policy of…/ have decided to…/ are forced to
Almost all… the (leading) researchers in this field…/ (older) voters…/ (new) graduates…
As you are (all) aware,… the (Japanese) government…/ (foreign) news outlets…
As you (probably) know,… this university…/ the author (name)…
Hopefully you have (all) read… the (background) reading that I gave you last week./ the
next chapter in the book.
I hope you remember that…  we agreed on…/ we came to the conclusion…/ we read
that…
I was taught that… women should…/ it was the role of the husband to…/ capitalism is…
In modern… life,…/ society,…
In our globalised… world,…/ economy,…
It has been suggested by… (name)…/ several authors…/ a (leading) researcher…
Last week we… studied…/ talked about…./ came to the (provisional) conclusion on
Many (older/ younger) people…  are of the (fixed) opinion that…/  have to deal with the
(critical) issue of
...
Many experts (in this field)… claim that…state that…/ agree that
Perhaps a majority of… people (in the world)…/ (developing) countries….
There   are   several   (different)…  views   on…/   ways   of   analysing…./   approaches   to…/
(theoretical) solutions to…
Recently, there has been a lot of… controversy about…/ debate about…/ news coverage
of…/ (online) discussion about…/ Twitter storms about…
You may have… seen (in the news) that…./ heard…./ realised that…/ been wondering…

Giving instructions/ Explaining the organisation of the discussion/ Explaining the
agenda
General instructions/ Overall instructions
Today’s task is to… debate…/ come up with…/ start thinking about…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Please make sure that you... all contribute (equally) to the discussion./ look at both sides
(of the argument)./ use the theories (we discussed) to analyse the situations.
I’d like you to…… brainstorm…/ decide on…/ think of (good) reasons for…/ rank…
Don't worry about... your lack of knowledge of the topic.
You have five minutes to... come to (some kind of) an agreement.
First
I plan to begin today’s session with… a video on…/ an overview of…/ an introduction to…
First (of all), I’ll set out… the situation./ the (two) sides of the debate./ the (most important)
differences between the (two) sides on this issue.
Before the discussion, you have 5 minutes to… brainstorm ideas./ plan what you’re going
to say.
We’ll start off with… a presentation by…/ a recap of…
For the first ten minutes... I’ll let you prepare for the (later) discussion by…
In order to do this, you need to split into…  pairs./ groups (of three or four people)./ two
teams/ people who think… and people who…
Second/ Next
Secondly, I’m going to get you to…discuss it (in groups)./ try to work your way towards
agreement./ work on your own ideas. 
 
And then I’ll ask each group to…  explain their positions./ give a (short) presentation./
nominate one person (to speak for them).
After that, I’ll… open the discussion up (to everyone)./ give you a chance to…
Then, we’ll… move onto…/ turn our attention to…
Finally
After all that, we’ll… bring the discussion together.
We’ll finish with… presentations by each group.
Last (of all),… I’ll summarise (the discussion) and make my own contribution.
The last stage will be…a whole class discussion.
If we have time, we’ll (also)… have a vote on the issue.
Explaining the aim of the discussion/ Giving the reason(s) for the discussion
The reason (why) I want to discuss this is to… increase your understanding of…/ check
how well you understood…
Through this discussion I hope you can… appreciate the usefulness of/ gain an ability to
By the end of today’s session, we should have…  come to (some kind of) a consensus
on…/ understood the difference between…
Really getting started
So, as I explained, let’s begin by…  discussing this in groups./ brainstorming our ideas./
getting (some) ideas together so that we can…
(name) , maybe we can start off by…  hearing your views./ hearing your presentation./
listening to your summary of last week’s assignment.
(name), would you like to… kick off./ get the ball rolling./ start the discussion./ give your
views on this first
?
So, please get into… groups of three./ the same groups as last week./ two teams.
So, please listen carefully and… be ready to ask (relevant) questions when…/ make notes
so that you can…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

 
Interrupting and keeping students on topic
Sorry for interrupting, but… (I think) you’re answering a slightly different question.
Can I stop you there and… bring you back to the topic (at hand).
Sorry for not letting you finish, but… to get back on track…
Could I interrupt you (for just a moment)? I’m afraid… you seem to be getting off the point.
I’ll let you finish (in a minute), but… the original topic is…
Interrupting and getting students to contribute
Before you go on, can we hear… what (name) has to say about this?
Excuse the interruption, but I don’t think we’ve…  heard from (name) yet./ heard from
anyone who has the opposite (point of) view.
Before you continue, does anyone else… have (any) opinions on this?/ want to comment
on this?/ want to add anything?
Thanks for your contribution, but…shall we see what (name) thinks?/ I think this is a good
time to hear from someone with the opposite point of view.
  
Moving the discussion on/ Hurrying students up
Quickly finish that stage and then… get ready for the whole class discussion./ get your 
(best) ideas down on paper./ prepare what you want your representative to say.
 
Just one minute… left./ before you need to…/ before we move onto….
Let’s not get stuck on… that point./ defining (our) terms./ the details (of the debate).
Starting other parts of the session
Moving onto… the summing up./ my contribution to the debate.
We seem to have finished that stage, so… let’s progress to…
Turning to…the next stage./ the whole class stage.
If no one has anything (else) to add at this stage,… we’ll turn our attention to…
It’s (about) time to… start coming to a conclusion.
We’re running out of time, so… let’s move our chairs and tables back to…/ all face…
In the final ten minutes, let’s… reflect on what we have learnt./ feedback on the discussion
(process) we went through.
 
Hopefully you’ve (all) finished… your (initial) brainstorm./ coming up with (five) ideas. 
By now you should have… completed your mind maps.
Bringing the discussion together/ Discussing as a whole class
Can you report back on… what you decided?/ the (different) points of view in your group?
Let’s go round (group by group) and… hear what they can add to the discussion.
What did you… choose?/ decide?
Summarising/ Drawing a conclusion from the discussion
So, to sum up what people have… said,…/ suggested,…/ presented,…
The consensus… seems to be…/ is clearly…/ isn’t (completely) clear but…
People’s views are (quite) different but… (I think) it’s fair to say that…/ the majority opinion
seems to be…
To summarise… what (all) the (different) groups said,…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

 
Giving and leading feedback on the discussions
You should have… considered more ideas before coming to a conclusion. 

I   was   impressed   by…  the   level   of   English   (that)   you   used./   how   well   you   expressed
yourselves.
You were supposed to… come to an agreement./ look at both sides before you came to a
conclusion.
Next time, I would suggest… the leader of each group being more active.
Next week, really try to… use the vocabulary (that) we studied./ learn the pronunciation of
the words (in the text) so that you can (actually) talk about it.
 

Talking about future actions
We’ll carry on this discussion… next week./ in the next class./ when we (next) have the
chance.
Please write a summary of your position and… email it (to me) by Friday./ hand it in (to
me) next week./ use that to compare ideas (with another student) next week.
 
Please use what you have learnt today when… you write your essays (on the topic)./ it is
your turn (to give a presentation).
I’ll send individual written feedback… before the next class./ as soon as I can.
Your marks will be posted… on the intranet./ on the noticeboard (outside my office).

Ending
We (seem to) have run out of time so…  we’ll call it a day./ we’ll (have to) leave the
discussion there.
Thanks for… (all) your contributions./ (all) your hard work./ making (such) an effort to
speak in English./ preparing so well.
See you… the same time next week./ next week./ the day after tomorrow./ the next time
(that) we run one of these classes./ around.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Leading a seminar/ discussion second practice
Start a discussion with phrases like those above, also helping during discussion and 
ending the session. Without looking below for now, try to remember or think of full 
sentences that someone leading the class/ seminar can say during class discussions. 
Then look at the sentence stems above to help, but expand them into full sentences. 
Finally compare with the phrases below. 

Suggested topics for group discussions
As long as the people who you are leading are capable of such a discussion (e.g. are from
the same field as you), you should lead a discussion which is like one you really have
experienced or are really likely to lead. Alternatively, you could ask the people participating
what kind of discussion might be realistic for them. If you can’t think of anything suitable,
use one of the suggestions below. The parts in bold can be used to make other questions. 

The best self-study to improve listening skills. 
Top five ways to learn academic vocabulary. 
The best solution(s) to problems with fluency.  
The best approach to 
cultural differences in communication.
How to cope with cultural differences in the use of gestures.
The main reasons for/ causes of…
Whether… is generally a good thing.
How… should change. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Which of these things might you ask students to do in class?

Ask questions during other people’s presentations

Brainstorm ideas/ useful language in groups

Change groups during the class

Choose from a worksheet with possible opinions/ useful phrases

Come to an agreement/ Come to a consensus

Contribute even if they don’t really have anything to say

Debate after preparation – Debate with no preparation

Decide how they will come up with ideas/ Decide how they will organise their own
group discussion

Do roleplay debates/ discussions

Find information in support of their positions

Form themselves into groups

Give each other feedback on their performances

Give group presentations

Hold debates within groups

Interrupt when they want to speak

Lead other people’s discussions/ Lead a whole class

Listen to something/ Watch something

Manage their own time in class

Nominate someone from each group to speak

Present based on what their group said/ Present based on what their group decided

Present information for the other people in the class to debate about

Raise their hands to show their opinions/ show their knowledge (or lack of knowledge)

Read different texts from each other and bring what they have learnt together

Read silently in class

Read something and freely discuss in it groups

Read something in class and discuss it with tasks given to them

Reflect on their own performances/ Reflect on what they have learnt

Speak about topics they don’t know much about/ Speak before being given information
on the topic

Speak from notes – Speak without notes

Speak in front of the class when told to

Split into two/ several teams

Study language which they could use during classroom discussions

Support the opinion that they have been given

Take notes on what people in their group say/ decide

Take part in a pyramid debate (trying to agree in larger and larger groups

Take part in whole class debates/ formal debates

Take the opposite side of the debate to their own views

Volunteer to speak out in front of the class

Vote (e.g. initial and final vote)

Work in groups to prepare what they will say in a whole class discussion

Work in the same groups as previous lessons – Work in different groups to previous
lesson(s)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Leading a seminar/ discussion third practice – roleplays

Set up and lead another discussion, this time trying especially hard to do the thing on the 
card below that you choose. When you finish, your partners will try to guess what your 
card said and then discuss how much of a good or bad thing that could be and if the level 
you did it was the right one. 

Give a very long introduction

Give complicated instructions.

Let the participants choose most things for themselves (how to organise their discussion,

who will have each role, etc).

Check and double check that the participants understand what you say (instructions etc).

Interrupt a lot.

Try very hard to get everyone making an equal contribution.

Give a very long ending.

Give a very short introduction. 

Add more instructions when the discussion had already started. 

Try to remember or think of as many phrases as you can for ending seminars/ discussions.

Use the sentence stems above to help you, but expand them. 

Compare your ideas with those below. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Giving positive and negative feedback after seminars/ discussions

Would the feedback of each whole sentence or two given below be positive or negative?
Write + for positive and – for negative next to each of the sections below. If you aren’t sure
about one sentence, check the one in the same section as it, which it will match. 

Did you take… into account?
I’m afraid

You don’t appear to have…
You were asked to work on…

… wasn’t (too) bad at all.
… was (much/ quite a lot) better than last time.

Before the next class…
If anything,… was better last week.

… compared well to those of your classmates.
Considering the difficulty of the task,…

Did you consider…?
I was disappointed to see that…

I can see (that) you (had) put (a lot of) effort into…
… was (almost) flawless.

Please make an effort to…
You didn’t put enough effort into…

If you think back to your feedback after the last session…
It was fine in terms of…

There wasn’t (really) enough
I had expected
… wasn’t (really) what I (had) expected.

You should (probably) focus on improving…
Don’t forget to…

… wasn’t (too/ very) good.
If you had…

… was really/ quite good
… was (utterly) impeccable.

I wasn’t (so/ very) impressed by…
… hadn’t (really) improved much.
You really need to improve

You’d really improved
I was (very) impressed by…
As I instructed, you…

Your instructions were…
Despite my (clear) instructions to…,…

There was a (clear) lack of…
You could learn a lot from…

Despite some language problems,…
You obviously learnt a lot from…
Although there is still a need for some…,…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

…. still need(s) to be (quite a lot) improved.
There was no need to…

Next time…
Next week…

Make a note to…
I hope you won’t take offence if I say…

… (really) paid off.
I was very pleased with…

You had (some/ quite a few/ quite a lot of) problems with…
You might remember that…

You had no problems with…
I hope I can expect more of the same next week.

I was glad to see that you…
I was happy to see that you…

You (really) should have… 
… wasn’t very strong.

You showed good evidence of…
… (really) stood out.
You struggled a bit with… Nevertheless,…

… was (absolutely) superb.
Due to your (thorough) preparation,…

If you had prepared more thoroughly
Have you thought about…?

Although last week I told you,…
You were told to…
Despite what I told you last week,…

There was too much…
Please try to…

The most useful feedback I can give you is…
Don’t take this the wrong way, but…

You did really well with…
Well done for…
You still need to work on… Nonetheless,…

… (still) needs some work.
It would have been (much) better with…

If I were you, I would
I would (strongly) recommend…
I would suggest…

… wasn’t sufficiently
You were supposed to… 
Please make sure you…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Try to remember or think of phrases using as many of these key words as you can. Some
can   be   used   with   more   than   phrase,   including   sometimes   both   positive   and   negative
sentences. You shouldn’t need to change the key words, but you can if you like. Phrases
which weren’t on the worksheets above are fine as long as they are suitable for giving
feedback.

account

afraid

appear

asked

bad

before

better

classmates

consider

difficulty

disappointed

effort

enough

expected

feedback

fine

flawless

focus

forget

good

if

impeccable

impressed

improve

improved

instructed

instructions

lack

learn

learnt

need

next

note

offence

paid

pleased

problems

remember

same

see

should

showed

stood

strong

struggled

sufficiently

superb

supposed

sure

thorough

thoroughly

thought

told

too

try

useful

way

well

work

would

Check with the worksheets above, asking your teacher about any other sentences you
came up with.

Test each other in pairs:
-

Read out phrases with the key words missing and see if your partner can guess what
they are, giving them hints if they get stuck

-

Read out key words and help your partner come up with the feedback phrases, giving
them hints if needed.  

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Choose some phrases which you would like to use in feedback.

Write continuations of some of the sentences. 

What kinds of things would you want to give feedback on?

Choose some things from this list:
-

Accuracy

-

Being easy to understand

-

Complex ideas

-

Cooperating/ Working well together

-

Coping with higher level students

-

Cultural differences

-

Fluency

-

Giving other people a chance to speak

-

Giving way too quickly

-

Helping weaker students

-

Improvements since last time

-

Interrupting

-

Politeness

-

Preparation before the session

-

Pronunciation

-

Silence

-

Subject knowledge

-

Support for arguments

-

Use of high-level/ ambitious language

-

Vocabulary knowledge

What questions could you ask to make them reflect on their performance, learning, areas
to improve on and priorities?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Cards to hold up

+ - + -
+ - + -
+ - + -
+ - + -

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

+ - + -

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Leading a seminar/ discussion fourth practice – problem roleplays

Choose one of the cards below and do that thing as much as possible while you take part 
in the discussion that one of your classmates sets up. They will interrupt and give 
instructions on how to improve the discussion if they think they spot something that you 
are doing wrong, then stop the discussion whenever they think they know what is written 
on your card and that of your partner or partners. After they give feedback on the 
discussion using positive and negative phrases, tell them if they guessed the thing which 
was written on your card.

Dominate the discussion (= talk all the other time and stop other people speaking)

Reject all interruption.

Keep all your contributions really short.

Don't contribute (= try to avoid speaking)

Don’t follow the instructions

Go off topic

Strongly attack other people’s arguments

Get stuck on one point (= don’t progress through the discussion)

Rush really quickly through the discussion

Claim that you can’t answer any of the questions, e.g. that you have no views on the

topic

Claim not to understand what the other people in your class are saying

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Agree with everything anyone says, without adding anything to their arguments

Speak really quietly

Do everything wrong.

Keep asking the discussion leader to speak (asking for confirmation that what you said

is correct, asking for their opinions, etc)

Only make eye contact with the discussion leader.

Ignore what other people say and just continue with your own argument (without

answering their counterarguments) 

Make your arguments too strongly (“Any idiot can see that…?” etc)

Take a position completely on the fence and refuse to decide one way or the other.

Dismiss arguments without saying why.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Feedback after group discussions

Ask each other the questions below, discussing them if you have different opinions or 
experiences. 

How well did you contribute to the discussions? 

Did how well you communicated improve over the length of the class/ classes you took 
part in? Why do you feel that way?

What will you try to do differently the next time you have the opportunity to take part in 
such discussions?

What were the most useful things you studied today?

What did you learn from people who you discussed the topics with?

What do you still need to find out about the topics that you spoke about?

What is most difficult about taking part in these kinds of discussions for you? How can you 
overcome those difficulties?

What can you do outside class to help you improve your knowledge of the topics that you 
spoke about?

What can you do outside class to help improve your ability to take part in group and whole 
class discussions in English?

How useful are the questions above for getting students to reflect on their performance 
and learning? Are there any which you wouldn’t use?

Can you think of any other useful questions or other ways to get students to reflect on and 
improve on their discussion skills?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015