Academic English- Persuasive Applications

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Functions & Text

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (98 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Persuasive Academic Applications
Tell your partner about an application that you might need to really make, preferably an 
academic one, for example an application for:
-

an academic job (e.g. teaching assistant or research assistant)

-

a non-academic job

-

a post-doc

-

a postgraduate course

-

some funding

-

a scholarship

-

a visa

-

membership of something, e.g. of a professional organisation or committee

-

an event, for example to attend a round table debate or workshop, or to give a presen-
tation at a conference

-

study abroad

-

a volunteer position

or information accompanying something you want to publish.

For the most likely of the situations you discussed, brainstorm the kind of information that 
the person reading your application will need in order to choose who is most suitable, then
rank those things (at least a top five in order). 

Add things from under the fold below that you think should be in the top ten. 
---------------------------------------------------

Aims/ Ambitions/ Plans

Attending events such as conferences

Challenges you have faced/ Overcoming difficulties

Contacts/ Size and importance of academic network

How prestigious journals etc that you have published in are

How prestigious your (present, past or future) university, department or course are 

Influence on your field or the world (being quoted etc)

Language skills

Overseas experience/ Overseas travel

Paid work/ Things you have learnt through your paid work

Positive feedback you have received on your research/ publications/ studies/ work

Publications

Qualifications (BA, postgraduate qualifications, language qualifications, etc)

Reasons for choosing your research topic

Skills you have learnt during your studies

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Teaching experience

The importance of your research/ research topic

The practical implications of your research/ research topic

Your attitude/ character

Your experience of things that you’ll need to do during the thing that you’re applying for

Academic skills

Being selected for things

Other awards/ achievements (prizes at school etc)

What examples can you give of the important ones, e.g. academic skills? 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Rank the academic skills below, starting by discussing the most and least important:

adapting ideas from other fields

analysing data (statistical analysis etc)

asking the right questions

bearing your audience in mind/ pitching things at the right level

being able to research in different ways (qualitative and quantitative, original methods)

being able to understand/ cope with foreign language lectures, conferences, etc

being objective

collaborating in foreign languages

collaborating online

collaborating with other departments and institutions

collecting evidence (interviewing, designing questionnaires, etc)

critical reading

dealing with authorities (getting funding, getting permission, etc)

dealing with large amounts of information/ reading/ sources

debating

editing/ proofreading

finding original sources/ rediscovering forgotten sources

finding practical implications

getting other people involved

giving evidence/ supporting your arguments

giving feedback

giving presentations (including poster presentations)/ lecturing

group work/ teamwork (group presentations, etc)

interpreting (well-known) research, data or theories in new ways

keeping up to date with the latest research, technology, etc

making a name for yourself/ publicising your research

mastering complex ideas/ explaining complex ideas

negotiating

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

networking/ making new contacts

organising events

problem solving

producing influential research/ publications

producing quotable research/ publications

reacting well to feedback

reading a lot in a short time/ using a wide range of sources

structuring your arguments

summarising

time management

translation

using academic language

using different kinds of evidence

using foreign language sources

using language precisely/ using jargon correctly

using sources

using technology

using your personal experience

What evidence can you give for the most important things?

What aspects of your personality/ attitudes might you want to show in your application?
What evidence could you give to prove them?

Choose important personality words below and give evidence for them. Your partner will
say whether they think that is important and whether they would be convinced by your
evidence. Note that words divided by a slash are similar but not exactly the same, so
choose one. 

Useful language
“By… I was able to contribute to…”, 
“Due to… I was able to…”
“I found my adaptability to be useful when…”
“I have proved…”
“I have used my ability to… by…”

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

“I think… shows…”
“I was awarded… for…”
“I was named…”
“My experience of… has allowed me to develop…”
“My knowledge of… helped me to adapt to…”
“People have described me as…”
“Using…, I accomplished…”

adaptable/ flexible
ambitious
broad minded/ open-minded
caring/ sympathetic
creative/ original
curious
dependable/ reliable/ responsible
determined/ resilient
diligent/ hard working
dynamic
efficient
energetic
independent/ self-sufficient/ proactive
innovative
leadership qualities
logical/ systematic
mature
motivated
organized
quick learner
sociable
well-rounded

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Use one of these phrases and your partner will tell you what aspect of your personality or 
attitudes they think it can be used to prove. 

“After finishing the course,…”
“I (eventually) overcame…”
“I collaborated with…”
“I contributed to…”
“I enjoy…”
“I had problems with… but…”
“I have a qualification in…”
“I have a strong interest in…”
“I have experienced…”
“I have mastered…”
“I helped…”
“I learnt how to… by…”
“I like the challenge of…”
“I was awarded…”
“I was named…”
“I won…”
“I’m eager to…”
“I’m fascinated by…”
“I’m looking forward to the challenge of…”
“I’m keen on…”
“In the short/ long term,…”
“my ultimate aim/ goal” 
“I’m well known for…”
“My (eventual/ main) aim/ goal is…”
“Unlike most people,…”

How can you make sure that the person reading your application notices the most import -
ant information? Discuss the same question for these kinds of application: 
Cover letter, CV, online CV (e.g. on LinkedIn.com), application essay (= personal state-
ment)

What process did you and should you use when writing an academic application? 

Would you use brainstorming and ranking stages similar to those you did above? If so, 
what would you do before and after those stages?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014