Academic Word List- Writing Tips

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (110 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Use the Academic Word List vocabulary to make tips on Academic Writing

Use some of the words below to give advice on good academic writing. 

abstract

accompany

accurate/ accuracy/ inaccurate/ inaccuracy

acknowledge/ acknowledgement 

adequate/ inadequate/ inadequacy

adjust

advocate

affect

aid

alter/ alteration

alternative

ambiguous/ ambiguity/ unambiguous

analysis/ analyse

appendix/ appendices

approach/ approachable

appropriate/ inappropriate/ appropriateness

approximate/ approximation

arbitrary/ arbitrariness

assign/ assignment

assistance

assume/ assumption

attach/ attached/ unattached/ attachment

attribute

author

authority/ authoritative

aware/ unaware/ awareness

bias/ biased

brief/ brevity

category/ categorize

chapter 

chart

cite/ citation

clarify/ clarity/ clarification

clause

coherence/ coherent/ incoherent

compile/ compilation

comprehend/ comprehensive

comprise

concept/ conceptual/ conceptualise

confer/ conference

conclude/ conclusion/ conclusive/ inconclusive

conflict/ conflicting

consent/ consensual

consistent/ consistency/ inconsistent

contact/ contactable

content

contradict/ contradiction

contribute/ contributor/ contribution

controversial/ controversy

convention/ conventional/ unconventional

correspond/ correspondence

credit

criteria

data/ figures/ statistics

define/ definition

differentiate

diverse/ diversity

draft 

eliminate/ elimination

emphasize/ emphasis

ensure

error

extract

feature

format

framework

fundamental

goal

grant

guideline

highlight

hypothesis/ hypotheses/ hypothetical

ignorant/ ignorance

illustration/ illustrate

impact

imply/ implication

incorporate/ incorporation

indicate/ indicative

infer/ inference

insert/ insertion

instance

interpret/ interpretation

issue 

journal

label

methodology

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

minimal/ minimise/ minimum

modify/ modification

norm/ protocol

objective

option/ optional

overall

paragraph/ paragraphing 

precede

precise/ precision/ imprecise

principal

process

proportion/ proportionate/ disproportionate

publish/ publication/ publications/ published/ unpublished 

quote/ quotation

reject/ rejection

relevance/ relevant/ irrelevance/ irrelevant

scope

significant/ significance/ insignificant

source 

specify/ specific

straightforward

structure/ structural

style/ stylistic

submit/ submission

subordinate

sufficient/ insufficient

summarize

theory/ theoretical

thesis/ theses

utilise/ utilisation

Suggested phrases

avoid
because/ as 
best
can
difficult
don’t
example
generally
if 
important
impossible
main
make sure
may
must
need
never
probably
require/ requirements
should
some people believe
sometimes 
therefore
unless
usually
worth

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Put at least one of the words above into each of the gaps below to make good advice 
about academic writing.
1. “The _______________________________________________________________” 

is an alternative to “I” in academic writing, though it can seem pretentious.

2. _____________________________________________________ can be labelled 

“Fig. 1”, but shouldn’t be referred to as “The figure”, as that means “The number”.

3. A good title can really ______________________________ how many people read 

your paper, and therefore also influence how often your paper is cited in the future. 

4. A second ______________________________________________________ of your 

writing should be edited versions of the first attempt, not the original version with 
notes. However, you can mark the changes to make them stand out, by using red fonts
etc.  

5. ________________________________________________________ of data should 

be written after the diagram or table, perhaps following a more basic description.

6. Any __________________________________________________________ made in 

researching or writing the paper should be written near the beginning of a paper.

7. Don’t confuse a summary and a _________________________________________.
8. Don’t confuse magazines and academic (usually meaning peer-reviewed) 

_________________________________________ – New Scientist and National Geo-
graphic, to give two examples, aren’t good models for your own academic writing. 

9. Email approaches to academics who you have no connection to should be polite but 

state the reason for _____________________________________________________
them quite near the beginning of the email.

10. _____________________________________________________________________

your ideas while also sounding sufficiently academic can be difficult.

11. If you _________________________________ a quote (to make it understandable 

out of context or to shorten it), any changes should be marked with “…” and “[ ]”. 

12. If you want to _______________________________________________________ a 

particular government policy, that should usually be left until the final conclusion.

13. ________________________________________________________ grammar and 

information in citations can be marked with the expression “[sic]” in square brackets. 

14. ____________________________________________________ supporting evidence

is the most common reason for rejecting academic papers, with being too similar to 
other research being the second most common cause for having a paper turned down.

15. It can be difficult to make your language sufficiently academic and diplomatic without 

making the meaning ___________________________________________________. 

16. It’s sometimes worth pasting things into an email rather than including an 

_____________________________________________________________________
, as it saves formatting problems and being blocked by people’s spam filters. 

17. It’s worth mentioning when sources are particularly 

_____________________________________ and so should be taken more seriously.

18. Most publishers automatically __________________________________________ 

permission to quote from their publications, but it can be difficult and time consuming 
to get in contact with the right person. 

19. Nowadays, you will probably need ________________________________________ 

to use long or many extracts from a single publication. However, it’s not always obvi-
ous who to write to in order to get such permission. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

20. Only very long papers need _____________________________________________ –

shorter ones should be just be divided into sections. 

21. Perhaps the most important factors to make sure that your paper has an 

___________________________________ are its title and where it is published, with 
publishing the right ideas and the right time (matching the zeitgeist) also being impor-
tant. 

22. Phrasal verbs and other idioms are generally not _____________________________ 

in academic writing, unless there is no other way of saying something.

23. Professors obviously won’t correct the grammar in your essays, but it can be worth 

asking for extra feedback on your ________________________________________.

24. Some people believe it is impossible to avoid ______________________ in academic 

writing, so you should disclose all information which could affect your judgement. 

25. Some publications demand an _________________________________ summarizing 

the content of your paper, perhaps to be used on the index page of their website.

26. Some publications have their own _______________________________________ on

how to write for them, although some also refer you to style manuals such as the APA 
or The Chicago Manual of Style.

27. Starting a new paragraph is never _________________ – it is usually due to changing

topic (in some way), but also can be because the paragraph has gone on too long. 

28. The _______________________________________________________________ of

a proof-reader doesn’t usually need to be mentioned in your paper.

29. The ___________________________ that online editors want can vary, including .doc

(rather than more recent versions), .txt, or just the text pasted into an email. 

30. The main thing to decide before starting to write an academic paper is your 

_____________________________________________________________________
, in other words what you want to achieve by publishing that information in that way. 

31. The most important thing is to ___________________________________________ 

that your ideas can be understood.

32. The punctuation etc of an academic paper may have to be 

__________________________ to meet the requirements of a particular publication. 

33. When style guides _____________________________ each other it is usually best to 

follow the APA’s advice, unless the guidelines from the publication state otherwise. 

34. Word limits are rarely ___________________________________________________,

so you should stick to them exactly. 

35. You can sometimes include ____________________________________________ of 

help with your research and/ or paper such as a list of people who you want to thank. 

36. You must ____________________________________________________________ 

where your ideas come from, even if you aren’t directly quoting someone.

37. You need to be _______________________________________________________ 

with use of not of “I”, American or British English, referencing conventions, etc. 

38. You need to _________________________________________________________ 

between direct quotes and paraphrases of people’s ideas. 

39. You need to use ______________________________________________________ 

sources, for example not using the same dictionary for definitions throughout. 

40. You should show an ___________________________________________________ 

of the limits of your research and the ability to come to conclusion based on it, for ex-
ample in a section on this topic.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Hint: The words below should go in the gaps above. You shouldn’t need to change the 
grammar. 

abstract

acknowledge

acknowledgement

adjusted 

advocate

affect 

aid/ assistance

alter

ambiguous.

analysis

appropriate

approximate

arbitrary 

assignment

assumptions

attachment

author

authoritative

awareness

bias 

chapters

chart 

conclusion

consent 

consistent

contacting

contradict

differentiate

diverse

draft

emphasising

ensure

format

goals/ objectives

grant

guidelines

impact

inaccurate

inadequate

journals 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Suggested answers
1. 
“The _____________ author ______________” is an alternative to “I” in academic 

writing, though it can seem pretentious.

2. ________________________ chart _________________________ can be labelled

“Fig. 1”, but shouldn’t be referred to as “The figure”, as that means “The number”.

3. A good title can really ______ affect ___________________ how many people read 

your paper, and therefore also influence how often your paper is cited in the future. 

4. A second _______________ draft __________________________________ of your 

writing should be edited versions of the first attempt, not the original version with 
notes. However, you can mark the changes to make them stand out, by using red fonts
etc.  

5. _________________ analysis _______________________________ of data should 

be written after the diagram or table, perhaps following a more basic description.

6. Any _____________________ assumptions __________________________ made 

in researching or writing the paper should be written near the beginning of a paper.

7. Don’t confuse a summary and a ______________ conclusion __________________.
8. Don’t confuse magazines and academic (usually meaning peer-reviewed) 

____________ journals _________________ – New Scientist and National Geo-
graphic, to give two examples, aren’t good models for your own academic writing. 

9. Email approaches to academics who you have no connection to should be polite but 

state the reason for _______________ contacting __________________________ 
them quite near the beginning of the email.

10. ________ Emphasising ________________________________________________ 

your ideas while also sounding sufficiently academic can be difficult.

11. If you ___________ alter _________________ a quote (to make it understandable out

of context or to shorten it), any changes should be marked with “…” and “[ ]”. 

12. If you want to ______________ advocate ___________________________________

a particular government policy, that should usually be left until the final conclusion.

13. ___________ Inaccurate ___________________________________ grammar and 

information in citations can be marked with the expression “[sic]” in square brackets. 

14. __________ Inadequate ______________________________ supporting evidence is

the most common reason for rejecting academic papers, with being too similar to other
research being the second most common cause for having a paper turned down. 

15. It can be difficult to make your language sufficiently academic and diplomatic without 

making the meaning _____________ ambiguous ___________________________. 

16. It’s sometimes worth pasting things into an email rather than including an 

_____________________ attachment ____________________________________
as it saves formatting problems and being blocked by people’s spam filters. 

17. It’s worth mentioning when sources are particularly _______ authoritative ____ and 

so should be taken more seriously. 

18. Most publishers automatically ____________ grant _________________________ 

permission to quote from their publications, but it can be difficult and time consuming 
to get in contact with the right person. 

19. Nowadays, you will probably need ________consent ________________________ 

to use long or many extracts from a single publication. However, it’s not always obvi-
ous who to write to in order to get such permission. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

20. Only very long papers need ________ chapters ______________________________

– shorter ones should be just be divided into sections. 

21. Perhaps the most important factors to make sure that your paper has an _________ 

impact _______________ are its title and where it is published, with publishing the 
right ideas and the right time (matching the zeitgeist) also being important. 

22. Phrasal verbs and other idioms are generally not ______ appropriate ____________ 

in academic writing, unless there is no other way of saying something.

23. Professors obviously won’t correct the grammar in your essays, but it can be worth 

asking for extra feedback on your ___________ assignment __________________.

24. Some people believe it is impossible to avoid __________ bias _______ in academic 

writing, so you should disclose all information which could affect your judgement. 

25. Some publications demand an ____________abstract _____________ summarizing 

the content of your paper, perhaps to be used on the index page of their website.

26. Some publications have their own ________ guidelines ______________________ 

on how to write for them, although some also refer you to style manuals such as the 
APA or The Chicago Manual of Style.

27. Starting a new paragraph is never ________ arbitrary _ – it is usually due to changing

topic (in some way), but also can be because the paragraph has gone on too long. 

28. The _____________________ aid/ assistance ____________________________ of 

a proof-reader doesn’t usually need to be mentioned in your paper.

29. The ____________ format ________ that online editors want can vary, including .doc 

(rather than more recent versions), .txt, or just the text pasted into an email. 

30. The main thing to decide before starting to write an academic paper is your 

_____________________________ goals/ objectives ______________________, in
other words what you want to achieve by publishing that information in that way. 

31. The most important thing is to ______________ensure ______________________ 

that your ideas can be understood.

32. The punctuation etc of an academic paper may have to be ______________ adjusted

________________ to meet the requirements of a particular publication. 

33. When style guides _____________contradict ________ each other it is usually best 

to follow the APA’s advice, unless the guidelines from the publication state otherwise. 

34. Word limits are rarely _______________approximate________________________

so you should stick to them exactly. 

35. You can sometimes include ___________acknowledgement____________________

of help with your research and/ or paper such as a list of people who you want to 
thank. 

36. You must ______________acknowledge_________________________________ 

where your ideas come from, even if you aren’t directly quoting someone.

37. You need to be _____________________consistent__________________________ 

with use of not of “I”, American or British English, referencing conventions, etc. 

38. You need to ____________________ differentiate _________________________ 

between direct quotes and paraphrases of people’s ideas. 

39. You need to use ______________diverse_________________________________ 

sources, for example not using the same dictionary for definitions throughout. 

40. You should show an ________awareness____________ of the limits of your research

and the ability to come to conclusion based on it, for example in a section on this topic.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013