Academic Writing- Brainstorming and Tips

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Functions & Text

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (113 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Good Academic Writing Brainstorming and Tips
Useful vocabulary for talking about academic writing and understanding tasks
What is good academic writing?

Draw a circle around the words below and then brainstorm a mind map on the topic. 

good academic writing

Look on the next page if you need suggestions for what to put on the mind map.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Possible suggestions for the main categories on the mind map
Culture
Influence
Interest/ Readability
Language (grammar, vocabulary, punctuation, spelling, etc)
Objectivity
Organisation
Persuasiveness/ Strength of arguments
Process (planning etc)
Publication
Readership
Style
Time management
Topic

Look at the next page when you need help to extend your discussion. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Possible subcategories

Abbreviations (e.g. acronyms)

Academic vocabulary (e.g. the Academic Word List)

Affixes (= prefixes and suffixes)

Appendices

Bibliography/ List of references

Brackets

British/ American English

Bullet points/ Numbering

Chapters/ Sections

Citations/ Quotations

Colons/ Semi-colons

Conclusion/ Summary

Contractions

Counterarguments/ Counterexamples

Dash

Data/ Figures/ Statistics

Defining your terms

Determiners

Diagram (e.g. line graph, pie chart)

Drafts

Editing/ Proofreading

Evidence/ Supporting arguments

Exclamation marks

Fixed phrases/ Idioms

Footnotes

Headings

Introduction

Jargon

Latinate vocabulary

Linking (e.g. linking expressions like “Furthermore”)

Mind map

Paragraphs

Paraphrasing

Passive

Personal pronouns

Questions/ Rhetorical questions

Title

Topic sentence

Check the meaning of any words above that you aren’t sure of, particularly differences 
between them. 

What would your advice be on the topics above? Ask your partner about one you aren’t 
sure about and see what they say. 

Ask your partner, another group and then the whole class about any topics above you 
have any doubts about.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Discuss if the advice below is good or not and put a tick, cross or ? if you aren’t sure or it 
depends next to each one. 
1. Academic papers often have a title with two parts separated by a colon to catch your 

attention, give useful information about what is in the paper, and use lots of key words

2. Academic vocabulary

 

  tends to consist of longer Latinate words, often with affixes

3. Appendices

 

  are generally better than footnotes

4. Avoid abbreviations
5. Avoid colons and, especially, semi-colons where possible, because even native speak-

ers tend to use them badly

6. Avoid jargon
7. Avoid one-sentence paragraphs
8. Avoid repeating words
9. Avoid rhetorical questions
10. Avoid starting sentences with “and” and “but”
11. Being difficult to understand is likely to have the most impact on the score of any 

marked academic writing

12. Contractions

 

  are too informal for much academic writing 

13. Dashes

 

  are too informal for much academic writing

14. Decide on both the main readership and wider possible readership of a paper before 

writing it, and particularly before choosing a title

15. Exclamation marks

 

  are very informal

16. Explain the organisation of your writing in the introduction
17. Idioms

 

  are often informal

18. It can be useful to think of the title of an academic paper as being similar to that of a 

webpage that is trying to get as many Google hits and readers as possible

19. It can help to keep a list of your own common errors to check your writing against
20. Lots of different support for your arguments is usually better than detailed examination 

of one kind of support for your argument, particularly in writing with time or word limits

21. Make changes to a second draft in the main text and delete all macros (comment 

boxes etc) before submitting it again

22. Most non-native English speakers use too few determiners (a, an, the, etc). In English 

the default is to use something, and you need a special reason to use nothing.

23. Most publications have their own criteria about what written style to use
24. One paragraph is one topic, so a new paragraph means a new topic (in some way)
25. Only sources which are cited in the paper should be included in the list of references
26. Quoting

 

  directly is always better than paraphrasing

27. The editing stage is also a good chance to add more complex language, especially if 

you can get feedback afterwards on how well you used it

28. The first person (= “I”) is never acceptable in academic writing
29. The more references the better
30. Tips on using most kinds of punctuation (brackets, commas, semi-colons, etc) varies 

depending on British or American English, which style guide, publication, which ex-
pert’s advice you look at, etc. 

31. Try to be consistent with use of British and American English
32. Use as many linking expressions as possible
33. Use passives whenever possible, for example lots of phrases like “It is said that…” and

“… is considered to be…”

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Can you change the advice above which is bad to make it better?

Add ideas from above to your mind map. 

Compare your mind map another group and then discuss the questions below.

Discussion

Which of the things on your mind map are most difficult and most important? How 
could you improve your ability to do those things?

How can you use brainstorming and mind maps in academic writing? What other ways
of coming up with ideas are there?

Do you think your mind map is a good example? What could be improved about it?

Your homework will be to write a 300 word essay on the topic of good academic writ-
ing. How useful do you think the mind map you created today could be?

What else will you need to do before you start writing that essay?

What should the rest of the process consist of?

Homework
Write the essay described above, making sure it is also an example of good academic 
writing, especially:
-

Defining your terms

-

Including references

-

Planning

Please write a plan at the top of the page before you start writing and include that in the 
homework you submit to your teacher. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Suggested answers
Bad advice

Avoid abbreviations – Avoid informal abbreviations such as “asap” and “lol”, and 
explain all other abbreviations the first time you use them

Avoid jargon – Jargon is very useful because it usually has a more precise meaning 
that everyday English terms, but define all jargon the first time you use it. 

Quoting directly is always better than paraphrasing – Use a mix of quoting and 
paraphrasing, making it obvious which is which. However, too much direct quoting 
can lead to copyright concerns and you need to show that you understand and have
critically examined any things you quote directly

The first person (= “I”) is never acceptable in academic writing – It depends on the 
publication and field, but “I” is becoming more acceptable. 

The more references the better – Many publications now limit the number of 
references you can give, and it can be seen as trying too hard to impress without 
necessarily having original ideas of your own. 

Use as many linking expressions as possible – Good writing should be understandable 
without too many linking expressions, and you should avoid repeating the actual 
expressions you use (which becomes difficult if you use too many)

Use passives whenever possible, for example lots of phrases like “It is said that…” and “…
is considered to be…” – Use a mix of passive and active voice, using the latter 
whenever appropriate. The passive can be useful to avoid “I” if that is necessary, 
but avoid expressions like “It is thought that…” unless you can say who by.
  

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013