Academic Writing- Cultural Differences

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (109 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Academic Writing- Cultural Differences
Read the descriptions of UK and US academic writing below and decide if each point is 
the same in other places such as your own country or not. If it is the same somewhere 
else that you know about, write the name of that country or those countries next to, e.g. 
“Japan” if you think that Japanese academic conventions are the same. If that thing is 
different in other countries that you know about, leave it blank and move onto the next 
one.  
Academic writing style cultural differences and useful phrases
Academic writing vs other writing styles cultural differences
Papers in peer-reviewed journals are very different to texts in newspapers and magazines 
such as articles, columns and editorials.

Journal papers are very different from graded academic writing such as class assignments
and essays in timed exams like IELTS essays and TOEFL essays.

Academic writing styles can vary from journal to journal, so you have to check each 
publication’s guide for writers and follow it carefully and/ or copy other papers in it.  

Academic writing titles cultural differences and useful phrases
Academic papers often have a title with two parts.

If the title of an academic paper has two parts, the two parts are usually separated by a 
colon (“Mastering ‘a’ and ‘the’: The effectiveness of a game-based approach”). 

Starting academic writing cultural differences and useful phrases
The introduction often includes something about the importance of the paper and/ or its 
conclusions (“If these results are repeated elsewhere, this could have huge implications 
for…”, “This provides a totally new point of view on…”).

The introduction often mentions who the piece will be of interest to. 

Papers are often consciously written with both specialist readers and more general 
readers in mind, and the introduction often mentions both groups (“The conclusions should
be of interest to anyone in the fields of…”, “The research also touches on the fields of…”). 

(Rhetorical) questions to the reader are usually unsuitable for research-based papers in 
academic journals, so you should keep the number of such questions to a minimum 
(probably no more than one question like “But what does this mean?” per paper). 

Introductions usually end by laying out what will be covered in the body of the piece (“This 
paper will look at and then turn its attention to…”, “The three reasons for this will be 
examined in turn below”). 

Personal pronouns in academic writing cultural differences and useful phrases
You should avoid addressing the reader as “you”.

“You” can be replaced by other expressions (“readers”, “readers of this journal”, “people 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

1

reading this paper”)

In most journals, you should avoid mentioning yourself in the body of your paper (so you 
should avoid “I”, “me” and “my”, and even “the author” should be avoided if possible, with 
expressions like “This paper…” and “In this study…” usually being better).

In some academic fields it is more normal to mention yourself when describing your 
research (for example when writing about some kinds of anthropological field work). 

Academic language cultural differences and useful phrases
Academic words tend to be longer than normal everyday words, meaning that you can 
make writing more academic by replacing words with a longer word (“attend” for “take part 
in”, “acquire” or “obtain” for “get hold of”, “retain” for “keep hold of”, “commence” for “make 
a start”, “the elderly” for “old people”, “substantial” or “considerable” for “quite a lot”, 
“initially” for “at first”). 

Many abbreviations are too informal for academic writing (so you should write “information”
instead of “info”, “he is” instead of “he’s”, “we have” instead of “we’ve”, “as soon as 
possible” instead of “asap”, “okay” instead of “OK”, “document” instead of “doc”).

Abbreviations related to the field that you are writing about are fine in academic writing, but
might need to be defined (“The North Atlantic Treaty Organisation, henceforth ‘NATO’”). 

Some abbreviations are standard in academic writing (in English mainly Latin ones like 
“e.g.”, “c.f.”, “pp”, “ca.”, “i.e.”, “NB”, “et al.”, “ibid.”, “no.” and “etc”, but also others such as 
“ed.”, “vol.”, “doi” and “n.d.”). 

Some linking expressions are only used to are used to link two ideas in one sentence 
while others are only used to link two different sentences (“and” vs “In addition”/ 
“Furthermore”/ “Moreover”, “but” vs “However”/ “In contrast”, “because” vs “The reason for 
this is…”/ “This is because…”, “so” vs “As a result,…”, “.e.g.” vs “To give an example,…”, 
“i.e.” vs “To put that another way,…”) and using them in the other way is usually wrong. 
Supporting your arguments in academic writing cultural differences and useful 
phrases

In academic writing, you should avoid stating your opinion without supporting what you say
(so you have to say “It is clear that… because…”, not just “It is clear that…”).

The best ways of supporting your arguments include quoting data and trends (“Recent 
statistics from… show that…”, “There has been a 300% increase in…”), quoting other 
people’s opinions and experiences (“Chomsky says that…”, “All the speakers at a recent 
conference agreed that…”), knocking down opposing arguments (“Although many people 
believe that…”, “It could also be said that…, but this doesn’t mean that…”), and logical 
arguments such as cause and effect (“This would inevitably lead to…”, “The result of this is
likely to be…”). 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

2

Hedging and generalising cultural differences and useful phrases
In academic writing, we need to be very careful not to overgeneralise (so avoid writing 
“Japanese people think…”, “It is thought that…”, “Experts believe that…”). 

To not overgeneralise, in academic writing we often add information on how many or how 
much something matches your statement, for example how many people something is true
for (“almost everyone”, “the vast majority of people”, “most people”, “many people”, “a 
considerable number of people”/ “a substantial number of people”, “some people”, “a 
considerable minority of people”).

To avoid overgeneralising, in academic writing we often add information on how often 
something is true or how often something happens (“almost always”, “usually/ generally”, 
“often/ regularly”, “sometimes”, “occasionally”).

So that we don’t overgeneralise, in academic writing we often add information on how 
likely something is to be true or to happen (“almost certainly”, “very probably”, “probably”, 
“possibly”, “conceivably”, “probably not”, “almost certainly not”).

Some hedging/ generalising language has very precise meanings (“possibly” vs 
“probably”, “most” vs “many”, “usually” vs “often”), so seemingly small changes can make 
a statement inaccurate.

There is also other hedging/ generalising language with less precise meanings (“seems 
to…”, “appears to…”). 

Punctuation, formatting and paragraphing in academic writing cultural differences 
and useful phrases
Special formatting (in English usually italics or quotation marks) is used to show unusual 
words that the reader is unlikely to know and/ or that you will define for them, including 
words which are not in a standard dictionary such as terms you made up yourself, very 
technical terms and foreign words (for example ““kismet’, which according to the Oxford 
English Dictionary (2011) is…” or “kismet, which Smith defines as…”). 

Certain punctuation marks are too informal for academic writing (so we don’t use “!”, “–” 
and “…” in academic papers, apart from in direct quotes). 

After a paragraph put a blank line or an indent before you start the next paragraph (not 
usually both a blank line and an indent).

Each paragraph has one clear topic, so you generally shouldn’t start a new paragraph 
without changing topic (at least a little).

We also sometimes start a new paragraph if the paragraph gets too long (over about five 
sentences). 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

3

Good paragraphs can be understood on their own (so it’s better to write “The second 
advantage of changing Chinese trade policy is…” instead of “Secondly,…”, “Another 
reason for moving towards a more data-driven approach is…” instead of “In addition”, 
“There are also disadvantages to privatisation” instead of “However,…”). 

You should avoid one-sentence paragraphs. 

As well paragraphs, academic papers are usually divided into larger sections.

Sections usually have headings, while individual paragraphs usually don’t.

Nowadays section headings are usually marked with bold script (rather than underlining, 
etc). 

It’s almost always better to avoid bullet points and use continuous prose (sentences and
paragraphs) instead.

Important information is usually emphasised with language such as words and phrases, 
not with punctuation or formatting (so in English we emphasise with phrases like “Please 
note that…”, “It should be noted that…” and “NB…”, not with brackets, quotation marks, 
underlining, bold script or capital letters).  

We never use all caps (“SMITH”, “NO doubt”, etc) in the body of academic writing. 

Ending academic writing cultural differences and useful phrases
A conclusion often starts with a summary of the information in the body of the piece (“As 
has been shown above,…”, “To summarise the points above,…”, “The main points above 
can be summarised as…”).

Academic writing needs a clear conclusion. If you are worried about overstating how sure 
you are about your conclusion, you should still have a clear conclusion but should use 
hedging/ softening language (“The data appear to show that…”, “In this situation it was 
clear that… and it seems likely that this would also be true…”). 

You should probably mention the implications of your conclusions for future researchers, 
government departments, etc (maybe quite hesitantly, as in “Because of this, in the future 
NGOs need to at least consider…”). 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

4

Brainstorming stage
Without looking above for now, write at least two suitable phrases in each of the gaps 
below. Many phrases not above are also possible. 
Academic writing titles cultural differences and useful phrases
If the title of an academic paper has two parts, the two parts are usually separated by a 
colon (__________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Starting academic writing cultural differences and useful phrases
The introduction often includes something about the importance of the paper and/ or its 
conclusions (____________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

The introduction often mentions who the piece will be of interest to. Papers are often 
consciously written with both specialist readers and more general readers in mind, and the
introduction often mentions both groups (_______________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Introductions usually end by laying out what will be covered in the body of the piece (____
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Personal pronouns in academic writing cultural differences and useful phrases
You should avoid addressing the reader as “you”. “You” can be replaced by other 
expressions (_____________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

In most journals, you should avoid mentioning yourself in the body of your paper (so you 
should avoid “I”, “me” and “my”, and even “the author” should be avoided if possible, with 
expressions like ________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________ usually being better).

Academic language cultural differences and useful phrases
Academic words tend to be longer than normal everyday words, meaning that you can 
make writing more academic by replacing words with a longer word (_________________ 
for “take part in”, ________________________ for “get hold of”, ____________________ 
for “keep hold of”, __________________ for “quite a lot”, ________________ for “at first”).

Many abbreviations are too informal for academic writing (so you should write __________
instead of “info”, _________________ instead of “he’s”, __________________________ 
instead of “OK”, __________________________________________________________).

Abbreviations related to the field that you are writing about are fine in academic writing, but
might need to be defined (_________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

5

Some abbreviations are standard in academic writing (in English mainly Latin ones like __
_____________________________________________________ but also others such as
_______________________________________________________________________).

Some linking expressions are only used to are used to link two ideas in one sentence 
while others are only used to link two different sentences (“and” vs ___________________
________________, “but” vs _____________________, “because” vs _______________
________________, “so” vs ____________________, ___________________________
___________________________,…”) and using them in the other way is usually wrong. 

Supporting your arguments in academic writing cultural differences and useful 
phrases
The best ways of supporting your arguments include quoting data and trends (________
_______________________________________________________________________),
quoting other people’s opinions and experiences (________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________),
knocking down opposing arguments (_______________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________),
and logical arguments such as cause and effect (_______________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Hedging and generalising cultural differences and useful phrases
In academic writing, we need to be very careful not to overgeneralise (so avoid writing 
________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

To not overgeneralise, in academic writing we often add information on how many or how 
much something matches your statement, for example how many people something is true
for 
(_____________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

To avoid overgeneralising, in academic writing we often add information on how often 
something is true or how often something happens (____________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________).

So that we don’t overgeneralise, in academic writing we often add information on how 
likely something is to be true or to happen (_____________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Some hedging/ generalising language has very precise meanings, so seemingly small 
changes can make a statement inaccurate (“possibly” vs _______________________, 
“most” vs _________________________, _____________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

6

There is also other hedging/ generalising language with less precise meanings (________
________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Punctuation, formatting and paragraphing in academic writing cultural differences 
and useful phrases
Special formatting (in English usually italics or quotation marks) is used to show unusual 
words that the reader is unlikely to know and/ or that you will define for them, including 
words which are not in a standard dictionary such as terms you made up yourself, very 
technical terms and foreign words (for example _________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Certain punctuation marks are too informal for academic writing (so we don’t use _______
_________________________________in academic papers, apart from in direct quotes). 

Good paragraphs can be understood on their own (both traditionally and nowadays when 
readers usually skim read almost everything, so it’s better to write ___________________ 
____________________ instead of “Secondly,…”, _______________________________ 
instead of “However,…”, ___________________________________________________).

Important information is usually emphasised with language such as words and phrases, 
not with punctuation or formatting (so in English we emphasise with phrases like _______, 
________________________________________________________________________
__________, not with brackets, quotation marks, underlining, bold script or capital letters). 

Ending academic writing cultural differences and useful phrases
A conclusion often starts with a summary of the information in the body of the piece (____
_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Academic writing needs a clear conclusion. If you are worried about overstating how sure 
you are about your conclusion, you should still have a clear conclusion but should use 
hedging/ softening language (________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________). 

You should probably mention the implications of your conclusions for future researchers, 
government departments, etc (maybe quite hesitantly, as in ________________________
____________________________________________________________________). 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

7