Academic Writing- Personal Information

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (95 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Personal Information in Academic Writing

Part One: Needs analysis interviews 

Interview your partner about the topics below, making brief notes in the spaces given.

Name

Education/ Qualifications (present, past and future educational institutions, faculties, courses,
etc)

Research (present, past and/ or future), including practical implications of that research, 
reasons for those research interests, personal information related to your research, etc.

Publications/ Academic writing (especially in English, including future)

Languages and language learning (present, past and future)

Influences/ Inspiration (books, people, theories, etc, including reasons for your interests)

Memberships, e.g. of professional or academic organisations such as international 
associations, committees

Attending and taking part in events, e.g. presenting at workshops or going to conferences 
(past and future, especially using English)

Teaching experience

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Other work and volunteering (present, past and future)

Other achievements/ awards

Aims/ Ambitions/ Plans

Overseas experience/ Overseas travel (past and future)

Hobbies/ Free time activities (present and past)

Useful language

(dissertation) supervisor

(final/ graduation) thesis/ dissertation

(private) tutor

(professional) license

Bachelor’s degree (= undergraduate degree = first degree, e.g. BA or BSc)

certificate/ diploma

cram school

exchange student

faculty

grad school

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

language school

lecturer/ professor/ tutor

major/ specialise in

Master’s (= MA, MSc, MPhil, MBA)

panel

PhD (= doctorate)

post-doc

scholarship

TA

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Personal Information in Academic Writing

Part Two: Discussion

Which information would you recommend your partner to include in the situations below 
(including both the information above and things you haven’t discussed yet)? Your partner 
will ask you about one situation, e.g. one they really need to write (in English), listen to 
your advice on what information to include and not include, then give you feedback on 
your ideas. 

Applications

A personal statement in support of your application for an academic course 

Your CV (to apply for academic positions or positions outside academia)

A cover letter when sending your CV (= résumé) to apply for an academic position/ job

An email accompanying an application for funding

An email accompanying an application to give a conference talk

Other emails/ letters

A letter to (hopefully) be included in the letters page of an academic journal

An email asking about for permission, e.g. to use something that is under copyright

An email asking for more information before writing for an academic journal

An email contacting a potential collaborator, e.g. someone you could write a paper with

An email contacting someone who you don’t know to ask for info about their research

An email praising someone who you don’t know for their recently published paper, re-
cently published book or academic presentation

An email to a future teacher/ professor who you have yet to meet

An email to your regular teacher/ professor/ supervisor

An email to a group of people who you know, e.g. all the students in your class

An email to a group of people who you don’t know, e.g. new PhD students

Online

Your publically available CV (for example on LinkedIn.com)

A comment on a blog related to your research/ studies/ area of interest

A comment in an online community (Facebook group, LinkedIn.com group, etc) related
to your research/ studies/ area of interest

Your professional social networking profile (e.g. Google + profile)

Your profile on your institution’s website

On the “About” page of your blog (one at least partly connected to your research/ 
studies)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Academic bios

An academic bio to accompany your paper when it is published in an academic journal

With a description of a talk you are giving, e.g. in a conference brochure

If you haven’t already, discuss these ones emailing and/ or applications ones above 
(depending on what is most useful for you or your teacher’s instructions)

Ask your teacher about any of the important situations for you which you aren’t sure about.

For homework, write at least one of the things above for homework and email to your 
teacher. If you do one of the application tasks, include the job advertisement, application 
form etc that you were thinking about when you wrote it. If it is a reply, if possible include 
the original email.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014