Academic Writing- Tips & Phrases

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (93 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Academic tips and useful phrases

Cross out tips about academic writing below that you don’t agree with, then compare with 
the rest of the class

-

Put the most important information first

-

Explain the structure of your writing in the introduction

-

A new paragraph means a new topic

-

Start most paragraphs with expressions meaning “First”, “Second”, “Next” and 
“Last”

-

Use “At first” and “At last” to mean “Firstly” and “Last”

-

Avoid starting sentences with “and” and “but” 

-

Use “On the other hand”, “Nevertheless” and “On the contrary” to mean “However”

-

Use “this/ these” with nouns like “problem” and “theory” to link to previous 
sentences

-

Use reference words and phrases rather than repeating the subject in later 
sentences

-

Use reference phrases rather than repeating the subject in later paragraphs

-

Avoid over-generalisations like “It is thought” and “Japanese people think”

-

Avoid “I” and “we”

-

Avoid “you”

-

Avoid abbreviations associated with your area

-

Avoid Latin abbreviations like e.g. and i.e.

-

Explain jargon

-

Avoid exclamation marks. Use expressions to mean the same thing instead

-

Avoid strong words like “nonsense”, “ridiculous”, “terrible” and “must”

-

Avoid rhetorical questions like “What should we do about this?”

-

Avoid multi-word verbs like “sort out” and “chase after”

-

Avoid short verbs with many meanings like “get” and “take”

-

Avoid vague and over-used words like “very” and “really”

-

Avoid contractions

-

Avoid repeating signalling expressions like “however”, “because”, “for example”, 
“also”, “if”, “in particular”, “in other words”, “generally” and “clearly” 

Brainstorm useful phrases for the ones that you haven’t crossed off.

Use the laptops your teacher gives you to look for online tips on academic writing and 
make a top ten list. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011

Suggested answers

-

Put the most important information first – “The main/ most important/ most 
significant/ most obvious…” “the thing that stands out is…”

-

Explain the structure of your writing in the introduction – “(In the paper) I will…/ This 
article will…/ The author will… and then…”

-

A new paragraph means a new topic – “Moving on to…/ Looking at…/ Turning our 
attention to…”

-

Start most paragraphs with expressions meaning “First”, “Second”, “Next” and 
“Last” – Probably not a good idea

-

Use “At first” and “At last” to mean “Firstly” and “Last” – Not a good idea as they 
have different meanings

-

Avoid starting sentences with “and” and “but” – “In addition” “Furthermore” 
“Moreover” “However” “In contrast”

-

Use “On the other hand”, “Nevertheless” and “On the contrary” to mean “However” 
– Only if you are sure that is what you mean, as they are all more specific than 
“however”

-

Use “this/ these” with nouns like “problem” and “theory” to link to previous 
sentences – “this issue/ idea/ concept/ argument/ point of view”

-

Use reference words and phrases rather than repeating the subject in later 
sentences – “it/ they/ this/ that/ these/ those/ one/ both” “The former”, “The latter”

-

Use reference phrases rather than repeating the subject in later paragraphs – Not a 
good idea as paragraphs should be able to stand alone. It is better to paraphrase

-

Avoid over-generalisations like “It is thought” and “Japanese people think” – “The 
majority of people think…” “Reading newspapers would give you the impression 
that…”

-

Avoid “I” and “we” – “The author(s)” “It was found that…”

-

Avoid “you” – “The reader” “People reading this description” “People interested in 
this matter”

-

Avoid abbreviations associated with your area – not necessary

-

Avoid Latin abbreviations like e.g. and i.e. – not necessary

-

Explain jargon – “that is (to say)…” “(…)” “usually defined as…” “used here to 
mean…”

-

Avoid exclamation marks. Use expressions to mean the same thing instead – 
“surprisingly” “to the surprise of the researchers…” “indeed”

-

Avoid strong words like “nonsense”, “ridiculous”, “terrible” and “must” – “debatable” 
“not desirable” “should probably”

-

Avoid rhetorical questions like “What should we do about this?” – “many people 
may wonder what we should do about this”

-

Avoid multi-word verbs like “sort out” and “chase after” – “resolve” “pursue”

-

Avoid short verbs with many meanings like “get” and “take” – “obtain”

-

Avoid vague and over-used words like “very” and “really” – “substantially” 
“significantly” 

-

Avoid contractions – “I am” “we have” etc. 

-

Avoid repeating signalling expressions like “however”, “because”, “for example”, 
“also”, “if”, “in particular”, “in other words”, “generally” and “clearly”– “although” 
“since” “for instance” “as well” “supposing” “particularly” “to put it another way” “in 
the majority of cases” “obviously”

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011