Academic Writing Tips with Useful Phrases

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (112 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Academic Writing Tips with Useful Phrases
Cross off any tips below which you (definitely, totally) disagree with. If you aren’t sure or it 
depends, leave it as it is. Don’t tick anything, just cross off ones that are obviously wrong. 
Academic writing introductions tips with useful phrases
Start the introduction by answering the question which you have been set or you have set 
yourself (“I believe that the government’s policy on…” etc).

Start the introduction by setting out the background to the question that you have been set 
or that you have set yourself (“In our globalised society,…”, “Over the last few years,…”, 
“For many people in modern society,…”, “According to some recent research,…”, “It has 
traditionally been believed that…”, “Many people believe that…”, “Until recently, it was 
thought that…”, “Recently there has been much debate over…”, “There are two very 
different points of view on the topic of…”, etc).

In the middle of the introduction, you should paraphrase the question which you have been
set or you have set yourself (“However, is really true that…?”, “This paper aims to judge 
the real influence of…”, “It has not, however, been conclusively shown if these results are 
also true for…”, etc).

At the end of the introduction, you should set out the structure of the body of the writing (“I 
will look at the advantages and disadvantages of this approach below”, “Three reasons for 
this view are given below”, “This essay will look at the advantages of the first approach 
and the disadvantages of the second approach, in that order”, etc).

Body of academic writing tips with useful phrases
You should usually start the first paragraph of the body of the writing with “Firstly,…”, “First
(of all),…”, etc.

You can start the first paragraph of the body with expressions for changing topic like “As 
for…”, “Turning (our attention) to…” and “Moving onto…”

You can start the first paragraph with general giving the topic phrases like “Looking at…”, 
“If we look at…” and “On the topic of…”.

It’s good to start paragraphs and the whole piece of writing with the most important 
information (“The main/ most important/ most significant/ most obvious…”, “The thing that 
stands out is…”, etc).

Start subsequent paragraphs or sections with other number-based expressions 
(“Secondly,…”, “Thirdly,…”, “Fourth,…” etc).

Start the last paragraph or section of the body with expressions explaining its final position 
like “Finally,…”, “Lastly,…” and “Last of all,…”.  

Use as many linking expressions (“However,…”, “Therefore,…”, “Subsequently,…”, “For 
example,…”, “In addition,…”, “… because”,  “unless”, “i.e.”, “in conclusion”, “in order to”, 
etc) as you can.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

1

It is okay to just repeat the same few linking expressions, e.g. “…also…” every time that 
you want to add another similar idea.

“However”, “On the other hand”, “In contrast” and “On the contrary” all have the same 
meanings.

Some linking expressions like “because”, “but”, “whereas” and “and” should be used to link
two ideas in one sentence (so not two ideas in two different sentences).

Avoid all abbreviations (acronyms etc, such as “NATO”, “asap”, “NB”, “OK”, “info”, “etc”,
“e.g.”, “i.e.”, “c.f.”, “pp.”, “ca.”, “ibid”,  “par. 2”, and “fig. 1”) 

Avoid jargon and foreign expressions that general readers wouldn’t understand like 
“biomechanics”, “post-structuralism” and “parasite singles”.

Put jargon and foreign words that general readers wouldn’t understand in italics or 
quotation marks the first time that you use them, then define their meanings with phrases 
like “This is usually  defined as…”, “According to the 2007 edition of the Oxford Advanced 
Learner’s Dictionary, this means…”, “…, used here to mean…”, and “… used in this paper 
with the specific meaning of…”.

English speakers don’t like repeating words, so you should rephrase as much as possible 
(“important”/ “vital”/ “crucial”/ “essential”, “problem”/ “issue”/ “barrier”, “advantage”/ “selling 
point”/ “benefit”/ “positive aspect”, “etc)

You should also try to avoid repeating jargon, using similar expressions like “the climate”/ 
“our weather”/ “weather systems” instead. 

Use brackets (), quotation marks “”, underlining, bold script, or CAPITAL LETTERS to 
emphasise important information.

Use language like “Please note that…”, “It is important to note that…” and “NB…” to 
emphasise important information.

To show your objectivity, it is best to use passive expressions without a subject such as “It 
is thought that…”, “It has been shown that…” and “… is considered to be…”

To make your writing persuasive, it is best to use a range of different support for your 
arguments, e.g. examples (“…e.g…”, “A good example of this is…”), quotations (“… said 
that…”, “According to…”), logical arguments (“… inevitably causes…”, “… obviously 
means that…”), rephrasing and explaining further (“To put that another way,…”, “…i.e….”, 
etc), comparing (“This is significantly more… than…”, “In complete contrast to this,…”, 
etc), referring to data and/ or visuals (“As can be seen from the line graph,…”, etc), and 
personal experience (“The author found that…”, “Comparing this to my own experience,…”
etc)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

2

Academic vocabulary tends to be long Latin-based words, often with prefixes and suffixes 
like “re-” and “-less”, rather than collections of short words such as phrasal verbs (“get on 
with”) and other idioms. For example, it’s better to write “the elderly” rather than “old 
people”, “obtain” rather than “get”, “pursue” rather than “chase after”, “artificial” rather than 
“man-made”, and “substantial” rather than “quite a lot”.

Referencing in academic writing tips with useful phrases
You can usually choose any system of academic referencing that you like, e.g. numbers in
square brackets (“[1]” etc) or family name plus page number in circular brackets (“(Smith, 
1976)” etc).

Quoting directly (“Smith (2001) wrote that…”) is always better than paraphrasing (“Smith 
believed that…”)

Only sources which are cited in the paper should be included in the list of references.

Punctuation in Academic Writing tips
Single quotation marks (‘’) and double quotation marks (“”) have completely different 
meanings, so you need to be careful which ones you use at each point. 

Even native speakers have problems using semi colons (;) correctly, so it’s best to avoid 
them as much as possible, usually just by starting a new sentence. 

Some punctuation such as contractions (“I’m”, “We’ve”, etc), dashes (“–”) and exclamation 
marks (“!” and “!!”) are considered too informal for most academic writing. 

Ending academic writing tips with useful phrases
A final paragraph can be a summary of the information given in the body of the writing (“To
summarise the information given above,…”, etc) and/ or a conclusion leading on from the 
information given in the body (“Although I have shown both benefits and drawbacks to this 
approach, I believe that for most people the most important factor is… and therefore the 
pros outweigh the cons”). 

It is okay to avoid any clear conclusion in your writing (“As I have shown above, there are 
both arguments for and against this course of action and which is better depends on the 
circumstances”, etc).

Hint: There should be 17 crosses above. 

Compare your answers as a class or with the answer key. 

Ask about any tips or language above which you aren’t sure about. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

3

Answer key
The underlined ones below are not good advice. 

Academic writing introductions tips with useful phrases
Start the introduction by answering the question which you have been set or you have set 
yourself (“I believe that the government’s policy on…” etc).

Start the introduction by setting out the background to the question that you have been set 
or have set yourself (“In our globalised society,…”, “Over the last few years,…”, “For many 
people in modern society,…”, “According to some recent research,…”, “It has traditionally 
been believed that…”, “Many people believe that…”, “Until recently, it was thought that…”, 
“Recently there has been much debate over…”, “There are two very different points of 
view on the topic of…”, etc).

In the middle of the introduction, you should paraphrase the question which you have been
set or that you have set yourself (“However, is really true that…?”, “This paper aims to 
judge the real influence of…”, “It has not, however, been conclusively shown if these 
results are also true for…”, etc).

At the end of the introduction, you should set out the structure of the body of the writing (“I 
will look at the advantages and disadvantages of this approach below”, “Three reasons for 
this view are given below”, “This essay will look at the advantages of the first approach 
and the disadvantages of the second approach, in that order”, etc).

Body of academic writing tips with useful phrases
You should usually start the first paragraph of the body of the writing with “Firstly,…”, “First
(of all),…”, etc.

You can start the first paragraph of the body with expressions for changing topic like “As 
for…”, “Turning (our attention) to…” and “Moving onto…”

You can start the first paragraph with general giving the topic phrases like “Looking at…”, 
“If we look at…” and “On the topic of…”.

It’s good to start paragraphs and the whole piece of writing with the most important 
information (“The main/ most important/ most significant/ most obvious…”, “The thing that 
stands out is…”, etc).

Start subsequent paragraphs or sections with other number-based expressions 
(“Secondly,…”, “Thirdly,…”, “Fourth,…” etc).

Start the last paragraph or section of the body with expressions explaining its final position 
like “Finally,…”, “Lastly,…” and “Last of all,…”.  

Use as many linking expressions (“However,…”, “Therefore,…”, “Subsequently,…”, “For 
example,…”, “In addition,…”, “… because…”,  “unless…”, “i.e.”, “in conclusion”, “in order 
to”, etc) as you can.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

4

It is okay to just repeat the same few linking expressions, e.g. “…also…” every time that 
you want to add another similar idea.

“However”, “On the other hand”, “In contrast” and “On the contrary” all have the same 
meanings.

Some linking expressions like “because”, “but”, “whereas” and “and” should be used to link
two ideas in one sentence (so not two ideas in two different sentences).

Avoid all abbreviations (acronyms etc, such as “NATO”, “asap”, “NB”, “OK”, “info”, “etc”,
“e.g.”, “i.e.”, “c.f.”, “pp.”, “ca.”, “ibid”,  “

 

 par. 2”, and “fig. 1”) 

 

 

Avoid jargon and foreign expressions that general readers wouldn’t understand like 
“biomechanics”, “post-structuralism” and “parasite singles”.

Put jargon and foreign words that general readers wouldn’t understand in italics or 
quotation marks the first time that you use them, then define their meanings with phrases 
like “This is usually  defined as…”, “According to the 2007 edition of the Oxford Advanced 
Learner’s Dictionary, this means…”, “…, used here to mean…”, and “… used in this paper 
with the specific meaning of…”.

English speakers don’t like repeating words, so you should rephrase as much as possible 
(“important”/ “vital”/ “crucial”/ “essential”, “problem”/ “issue”/ “barrier”, “advantage”/ “selling 
point”/ “benefit”/ “positive aspect”, “etc)

You should also try to avoid repeating jargon, using similar expressions like “the climate”/ 
“our weather”/ “weather systems” instead. 

Use brackets (), quotation marks “”, underlining, 

 

 bold script

 

 , or CAPITAL LETTERS to 

 

 

emphasise important information.

Use language like “Please note that…”, “It is important to note that…” and “NB…” to 
emphasise important information.

To show your objectivity, it is best to use passive expressions without a subject such as “It 
is thought that…”, “It has been shown that…” and “… is considered to be…”

To make your writing persuasive, it is best to use a range of different support for your 
arguments, e.g. examples (“…e.g…”, “A good example of this is…”), quotations (“… said 
that…”, “According to…”), logical arguments (“… inevitably causes…”, “… obviously 
means that…”), rephrasing and explaining further (“To put that another way,…”, “…i.e….”, 
etc), comparing (“This is significantly more… than…”, “In complete contrast to this,…”, 
etc), referring to data and/ or visuals (“As can be seen from the line graph,…”, etc), and 
personal experience (“The author found that…”, “Comparing this to my own experience,…”
etc)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

5

Academic vocabulary tends to be long Latin-based words, often with prefixes and suffixes 
like “re-” and “-less”, rather than collections of short words such as phrasal verbs (“get on 
with”) and other idioms. For example, it’s better to write “the elderly” rather than “old 
people”, “obtain” rather than “get”, “pursue” rather than “chase after”, “artificial” rather than 
“man-made”, and “substantial” rather than “quite a lot”.

Referencing in academic writing tips with useful phrases
You can usually choose any system of academic referencing that you like, e.g. numbers in
square brackets (“[1]” etc) or family name plus page number in circular brackets (“(Smith, 
1976)” etc).

Quoting directly (“Smith (2001) wrote that…”) is always better than paraphrasing (“Smith 
believed that…”)

Only sources which are cited in the paper should be included in the list of references.

Punctuation in Academic Writing tips
Single quotation marks (‘’) and double quotation marks (“”) have completely different 
meanings, so you need to be careful which ones you use at each point. 

Even native speakers have problems using semi colons (;) correctly, so it’s best to avoid 
them as much as possible, usually just by starting a new sentence. 

Some punctuation such as contractions (“I’m”, “We’ve”, etc), dashes (“–”) and exclamation 
marks (“!” and “!!”) are considered too informal for most academic writing. 

Ending academic writing tips with useful phrases
A final paragraph can be a summary of the information given in the body of the writing (“To
summarise the information given above,…”, etc) and/ or a conclusion leading on from the 
information given in the body (“Although I have shown both benefits and drawbacks to this 
approach, I believe that for most people the most important factor is… and therefore the 
pros outweigh the cons”). 

It is okay to avoid any clear conclusion in your writing (“As I have shown above, there are 
both arguments for and against this course of action and which is better depends on the 
circumstances”, etc).

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

6

Brainstorming stage
Without looking above, brainstorm useful phrases to do the things mentioned below. Many
phrases not above are also possible.

Academic writing introductions tips with useful phrases
Start the introduction by setting out the background to the question that you have been set 
or have set yourself 
(_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

In the middle of the introduction, you should paraphrase the question which you have been
set or you have set yourself (_________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

At the end of the introduction, you should set out the structure of the body of the writing 
(_______________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________)

Body of academic writing tips with useful phrases

You can start the first paragraph with general giving the topic phrases like _____________
________________________________________________________________________

It’s good to start paragraphs and the whole piece of writing with the most important 
information (_____________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________).

Some linking expressions like ________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________should 
be used to link two ideas in one sentence (so not two ideas in two different sentences).

Put jargon and foreign words that general readers wouldn’t understand in italics or 
quotation marks the first time that you use them, then define their meanings with phrases 
like 
_____________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

English speakers don’t like repeating words, so you should rephrase as much as possible 
(“important”/ _____________________________________________________________,
“problem”/ _______________________________________________________________,
“advantage”/ _____________________________________________________________)

Use language like _________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
to emphasise important information.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

7

To make your writing persuasive, it is best to use a range of different support for your 
arguments, e.g. examples (_________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________),
quotations (______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________), 
logical arguments (________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________), 
rephrasing and explaining further (____________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________),
comparing (______________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________),
referring to data and/ or visuals (_____________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________),
and personal experience (__________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________)

Referencing in academic writing tips with useful phrases
You can usually choose any system of academic referencing that you like, e.g. numbers in
square brackets (________________________________ etc) or family name plus page 
number in circular brackets (“(_______________________________________)” etc).

Quoting directly (__________________________________________) is always better 
than paraphrasing (______________________________________________________)

Punctuation in Academic Writing tips
Some punctuation such as contractions (____________________, etc), dashes (“–”) and 
exclamation marks (___________) are considered too informal for most academic writing. 

Ending academic writing tips with useful phrases
A final paragraph can be a summary of the information given in the body of the writing 
(“________________________________________________________________,…”, etc)
and/ or a conclusion leading on from the information given in the body (“____________
______________________________________________________________________”).

Compare your phrases with those on the worksheets above. Many other phrases are 
possible, so if you wrote something different please check it with your teacher.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

8