Adjectives- -ed and -ing drawing games

Level: Beginner

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Adjectives and Adverbs

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (100 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Adjectives- -ed and -ing drawing games
The cards below can be given out cut up and/ or as a worksheet (for both of the games 
described below). It’s probably best not to mix up the phrases and whole sentences in one
class, so you’ll need to decide which group of cards to use each time. Note that some of 
the cards take a bit of imagination (e.g. a number with a confused face and a question 
mark over its head for 
“A confused number”), so it’s probably best to let students choose 
cards themselves in some way, e.g. dealing them out and letting choose one of those to 
draw. If your students will have problems with the incidental language (
“driver” etc), you 
can use the blank cards to make up similar ones with vocab they already know. 

The paired sentences can be given out together in pairs or (with better classes) cut up, 
and you can get students to draw both phrases or sentences (e.g. both a bored teacher 
and a boring teacher) or just choose one of the two versions. 

Game 1: ed and ing adjectives Pictionary
Students race to shout out a description of an –ed or –ing sentence from below that has 
been drawn by the teacher or another student (on the board or on a piece of blank paper). 
For example, they have to shout out 
“a bored computer programmer” if someone draws a 
man leaning on his hand with his elbow on this desk in front of the screen full of code. If 
they have problems saying the right sentence, the person who is drawing can circle the 
person or thing to emphasise which kind of adjective it should be, or perhaps mime the 
same thing. 

Students can then make up their own cards to play the same games with and/ or do the 
same with the paired sentences.

Game 2: ed and ing adjectives drawing race
Students race to draw a sentence that has been shouted out, held up and/ or written on 
the board, or race to make the best drawing that they can in one minute. 

Students can then make up their own cards to play the same games with and/ or do the 
same with the paired sentences. 

After using the paired sentences, students can discuss which of the two are more common
each time. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

Single –ed and –ing adjective phrases to draw

a bored computer programmer

a bored shop assistant

a boring computer game

a challenging maths lesson

a confused ambulance driver

a confusing map

a disgusted toilet cleaner

a disgusting drink

a frightened doctor/ a scared doctor/ a terrified doctor

a frightening animal/ a scary animal/ a terrifying animal

a relaxed clown

a relaxing chair

a satisfied cleaner

a satisfying meal

a tired helicopter pilot/ an exhausted helicopter pilot

a tiring hike/ an exhausting hike

an annoyed babysitter/ an irritated babysitter

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

an annoying maze

an embarrassed chef

an embarrassing T shirt

an excited F1 driver/ a thrilled F1 driver

an exciting movie/ a thrilling movie

an interested student/ a fascinated student

a/ an ___________________ing _______________________

a/ an ___________________ed _______________________

a/ an ___________________ing _______________________

a/ an ___________________ed _______________________

a/ an ___________________ing _______________________

a/ an ___________________ed _______________________

a/ an ___________________ing _______________________

a/ an ___________________ed _______________________

a/ an ___________________ing _______________________

a/ an ___________________ed _______________________

a/ an ___________________ing _______________________

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

Single –ed and –ing adjective sentences to draw

The computer programmer is bored. 

The shop assistant is bored. 

The computer game is boring. 

The maths lesson is challenging. 

The ambulance driver is confused. 

The map is confusing. 

The toilet cleaner is disgusted. 

The drink is disgusting.

This doctor is frightened/ scared/ terrified. 

The animal is frightening/ scary/ terrifying.

The clown is relaxed. 

The chair is relaxing. 

The cleaner is satisfied.

The meal is satisfying.

The helicopter pilot is tired/ exhausted. 

The hike is tiring/ exhausting. 

The babysitter is annoyed/ irritated. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

The maze is annoying/ irritating.

The chef is embarrassed. 

The T-shirt is embarrassing.

The (F1) driver is excited/ thrilled. 

The movie is exciting/ thrilling. 

The student is interested/ fascinated. 

The _____________________is _____________________ing.

The _____________________is _____________________ed.

The _____________________is _____________________ing.

The _____________________is _____________________ed.

The _____________________is _____________________ing.

The _____________________is _____________________ed.

The _____________________is _____________________ing.

The _____________________is _____________________ed.

The _____________________is _____________________ing.

The _____________________is _____________________ed.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

Paired –ed and –ing adjective phrases to draw

A boring house.

A bored house.

A boring teacher.

A bored teacher.

A confusing map.

A confused map.

A confusing number.

A confused number.

A disgusting monster.

A disgusted monster.

A filling (roast) chicken.

A full chicken.

A frightening bug.

A frightened bug.

A revolting apple.

A revolted apple.

A scary doctor.

A scared doctor.

A thrilling roller coaster.

A thrilled rollercoaster.

A tiring mountain.

A tired mountain.

An embarrassing dog.

An embarrassed dog.

An exciting car.

An excited car.

A(n) _________ing _________.

A(n) __________ed _________.

A(n) _________ing _________.

A(n) __________ed _________.

A(n) _________ing _________.

A(n) __________ed _________.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

Paired –ed and –ing adjective sentences to draw

The house is boring.

The house is/ feels bored.

The teacher is boring.

The teacher is/ feels bored.

The map is confusing.

The map is/ feels confused.

The number is confusing.

The number is/ feels confused.

The monster is disgusting.

The monster is/ feels disgusted.

The (roast) chicken is filling.

The chicken is/ feels full.

The bug is frightening.

The bug is/ feels frightened.

The apple is revolting.

The apple is/ feels revolted.

The doctor is scary.

The doctor is/ feels scared.

The roller coaster is thrilling.

The rollercoaster is/ feels thrilled.

The mountain is tiring.

The mountain is tired.

The dog is embarrassing.

The dog is embarrassed.

The car is exciting.

The car is excited.

The __________ is _______ing.

The ________ is _______ed.

The __________ is _______ing.

The ________ is _______ed.

The __________ is _______ing.

The ________ is _______ed.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

Sentences with both –ed and –ing adjectives to draw

The cat is frightened because the mouse is frightening.

The mouse is confused because the maze is confusing.

The man is tired because the mountain is tiring.

The girl is disappointed because the present is disappointing.

The cat is bored because the (cat) toy is boring.

The elephant is disgusted because the tree is disgusting.

The _______ is ______ed because the ______ is ______ing.

The _______ is ______ed because the ______ is ______ing.

The _______ is ______ed because the ______ is ______ing.

The _______ is ______ed because the ______ is ______ing.

The _______ is ______ed because the ______ is ______ing.

The _______ is ______ed because the ______ is ______ing.

The _______ is ______ed because the ______ is ______ing.

The _______ is ______ed because the ______ is ______ing.

The _______ is ______ed because the ______ is ______ing.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017