Architecture- Numbers Review

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Numbers

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (85 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Numbers practice for architects
Worksheet 1 – Questions about numbers

What numbers could you use to describe a building or infrastructure project?

What numbers could you use to describe the job of architect?

What questions would you ask to get the numbers you discussed above in response?

How would the questions which got the following answers start?

eight thousand seven hundred and seven

three hundred and thirteen litres

twelve foot three (inches)

seventy three point five two kilometres

two and three quarter hours

nineteen seventy six

eighty three dollars ninety nine/ eighty three dollars and ninety nine cents

a hundred and twenty two percent

three hundred and fifty grams

a magnitude of seven point three on the Richter scale

seventeen square metres

once a week

Write the numbers above (except the last one) as figures.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011

Numbers practice for architects
Worksheet 2 – Pairwork - Student A
Choose one of the numbers below and turn it into a question. Your partner should guess  
the answer and then you should give them hints until they get it exactly right.

Useful language
No. It’s much much/ much (= a lot)/ quite a lot/ a bit (= a little)/ a tiny bit…
… bigger/ smaller/ higher/ lower/ longer/ more/ less/ earlier/ later (than that)

1. The average salary in Florida for an architect in nineteen ninety nine was fifty five 

thousand and ten dollars.

2. The average salary in Florida for a surveyor in nineteen ninety nine was thirty six thou-

sand five hundred and fifty dollars.

3. The average salary in Florida for civil engineers in nineteen ninety nine was fifty three 

thousand nine hundred and forty dollars.

4. Forty two percent of graduates from US architecture schools in two thousand and ten 

were women

5. Six percent of graduates from US architecture schools in nineteen seventy were wo-

men

6. Twenty four percent of the working architects in the US in two thousand and ten were 

women

7. Ancient Roman tenement houses had three storeys.
8. The heaviest stones in Stonehenge weigh forty five tonnes.
9. It took a hundred and thirty years to complete the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Amiens.
10. There are two and a half million rivets in the Eiffel Tower.
11. The smallest church in the world (near Covington, Kentucky, U.S.A) can only accom-

modate three people.

12. The Empire State Building has over ten million bricks. 
13. There is a thirty-nine-storey cemetery in Sao Paulo. 
14. Twenty five percent of the ten thousand three hundred glass panels in Boston's Han-

cock Tower fell to the ground between nineteen seventy one and nineteen seventy 
three. 

15. The Empire State Building took one year and forty five days to build.
16. There are a hundred and two floors in the Empire State Building.
17. The Empire State Building has six thousand five hundred windows
18. It took seven million man-hours to construct the Empire State Building. 
19. It took fifty seven thousand tons of steel to construct the frame of the Empire State 

Building.

20. Five people died while building the Empire State Building
21. The most expensive house in the world (Villa La Leopolda in Nice, France, the home 

of Bill Gates and now Roman Abramovich) is worth three hundred and ninety eight mil-
lion three hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 

22. The Eiffel Tower is repainted every seven years with fifty tons of dark brown paint.
23. The first skyscraper (The Home Insurance Building in Chicago) was built in eighteen 

eight five. It had ten storeys.

24. The Empire State Building is struck by lightning about a hundred times a year.
25. The Library Tower in Los Angeles is designed to withstand an earthquake of eight point 

three on the Richter scale.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011

Numbers practice for architects
Worksheet 2 – Pairwork - Student B
Choose one of the numbers below and turn it into a question. Your partner should guess  
the answer and then you should give them hints until they get it exactly right.

Useful language
No. It’s much much/ much (= a lot)/ quite a lot/ a bit (= a little)/ a tiny bit…
… bigger/ smaller/ higher/ lower/ longer/ more/ less/ earlier/ later (than that)

1. Buckingham Palace has seven hundred and seventy five rooms, including seventy 

eight bathrooms. 

2. There are one thousand five hundred and fourteen doors and seven hundred and sixty 

windows in Buckingham Palace. 

3. There are over forty thousand light bulbs in Buckingham Palace. 
4. Buckingham Palace's garden covers forty acres.
5. There are more than three hundred and fifty clocks and watches in Buckingham 

Palace. Two full-time members of staff keep them in good working order.

6. The Golden Gate Bridge is one point seven miles (two point seven three seven kilo-

metres) long, ninety feet (twenty seven metres) wide, and weighs eight hundred and 
eighty seven thousand tons. 

7. Thirty eight painters and seventeen ironworkers work full time on the Golden Gate 

Bridge.

8. Fifty five percent of the Japanese coastline is covered in concrete.
9. More than half a million homes were destroyed in the Great Kanto Earthquake in Ja-

pan in ninety twenty three.

10. There are around one thousand two hundred and fifty police boxes in Tokyo.
11. The Oedo line in Tokyo cost one point four trillion yen to build (the most expensive un-

derground line in the world).

12. The Great Pyramid in Egypt weighs six million six hundred and forty eight thousand 

tons.

13. Over one hundred and eighty stars have their handprints or footprints in the concrete 

of the pavement outside Mann's Chinese Theater in LA. 

14. The Statue of Liberty weighs two hundred and twenty five tons.
15. There are one thousand seven hundred and ninety two steps to the top of the Eiffel 

Tower. 

16. The Main Library at Indiana University sinks one inch (two point five two centimetres) 

every year (because the engineers failed to take into account the weight of all the 
books that would occupy the building).

17. Concrete was invented more than two thousand years ago.
18. The largest stained-glass window in the world (at the Kennedy International Airport in 

New York) is three hundred feet wide and twenty three feet high. 

19. The Pentagon building has sixty eight thousand miles of telephone lines.
20. The Burj Khalifa in Dubai is two thousand seven hundred and sixteen feet (eight hun-

dred and twenty eight meters) tall and has a hundred and sixty storeys 

21. The Bridge of Eggs in Lima, Peru, was made with mortar made with ten thousand 

eggs (instead of water). It is over four hundred years old. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011

Without looking at the previous worksheets, try to remember how the following numbers  
are pronounced.

1999
$55,010
$36,530
42% 
2010
2,500,000
10,300
102 
6,500
57,000
$ 398,350,000
1885
100
8.3
1,514
350
1.7
2.737
500,000
1,400,000,000,000
6,648,000
400,000
2,716
10,000 

Look back at your previous worksheets to check. Some other ways might also be possible,  
so check with your teacher. 

What are the rules for using “and”, commas in large numbers, and numbers after the  
decimal point?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011

Answer key

eight thousand seven hundred and seven – 8307 – How many…?

three hundred and thirteen litres – 313 l – How much…?/ How many litres (of)…?

twelve foot three (inches) – 12’ 3 (“) - How long/ tall/ high/ thick/ wide…?

seventy three point five two kilometres – 73.52 km - How long/ tall/ thick/ wide/ far…? 

two and three quarter hours – 2 3/4 hrs – How long… (does… take)?

nineteen seventy six – 1976 - When…?/ In which year…?

eighty three dollars ninety nine/ eighty three dollars and ninety nine cents – $83.99 - 
How much… (does… cost)?

a hundred and twenty two percent – 122% - How much…?/ How many percent…?/ 
What percentage (of)…?

three hundred and fifty grams – 350 grams – How much (does… weigh)?/ How many 
grams (does.. weigh)?/ What is the weight (of)…?

a magnitude of seven point three on the Richter scale – How strong…?/ What point on 
the Richter scale…?

seventeen square metres – 17 m2 – How big…?/ What is the area (of)…?/ How much 
area (does… cover)?

once a week – How often…?/ How many times a week…?

What are the rules for using “and”, commas in large numbers, and numbers after the  
decimal point?
“And” comes between hundreds and tens, so not the same position as commas. Commas 
go after every group of three numbers and are how we show the transition from thousand 
to million, million to billion, etc. Numbers after decimal points are pronounced one by one, 
so “point one hundred and twelve” would be wrong. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011